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A lot of other forums do this so I figured I'd start one here.

I'll start -

On the way:
2019 I-Pace FE Corris Grey

Current:
2016 X5 35D M-Sport - Leaving soon
2017 Volvo XC90 Inscription
2003 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 6MT
1974 Alfa Romeo Spider - Survivor

Who is next?
 
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A lot of other forums do this so I figured I'd start one here.

I'll start -

On the way:
2019 I-Pace FE Corris Grey

Current:
2016 X5 35D M-Sport - Leaving soon
2017 Volvo XC90 Inscription
2003 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 6MT
1974 Alfa Romeo Spider - Survivor

Who is next?
1971 Dodge Dart Swinger
1969 Chrysler Town and Country Wagon
1979 Dodge Omni
1975 Dodge Dart Sport
1984 Chrysler LeBaron
1981 Dodge Mirada
1992 Honda Prelude
2007 Smart TwoFour
1961 Plymouth Savoy
1978 Dodge Aspen
1974 Dodge Dart Swinger
1977 Plymouth Voltaire
1985 Dodge Rampage
At least a couple dozen more,
 

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I'll continue-

On the way:
2019 I-Pace SE Borasco Grey w Red Interior

Current:
2013 Kia Sportage Turbo
2002 Chrysler PT Cruiser
 

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Garaged 12/22: 2019 I-Pace (specs below), my first EV, 7th SUV.

Prior...
2013 GL450 (gave up waiting for Model X)
2008 GL550
2005 ML450
2002 ML450
[Having owned 6 MBZ vehicles (including wife's S500 and SLK350), I looked at the EQC, but found specs and styling uncompelling vs. I-Pace]
1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd.
1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd.
1991 Corvette convertible
1986 Corvette convertible
Mileage was clearly never a factor for me, so why should range be one now?:grin2:
 

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Scion FRS, Subaru Forester, RAM 1500, and Spark EV. Soon we'll sell the RAM and turn in the Spark.
 

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1983-1985 Opel Kadett 1974
1985-1987 Audi 80 1980
1991-2008 VW Vanagon Wolkswagen Edition 1984
2004-present VW V6 Touareg 2004
2016-present Audi A3 etron

not listing my wife's and kids' cars (2 Jetta, 1 Civic, 1 Avalon)
The Vanagon was and the Tourareg still is amazing.
 

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Now:

2019 I-Pace First Edition as of 11/30 (Bought new)
2009 Toyota Venza (Bought new)

Before:

1986 Maxima GLE (Bought new)
1999 Maxima GLE (Bought new)
2001 Toyota Corolla Wagon (Bought new)

Yep I keep my cars a long time.


plus my sons cars: 2016 BMW M3 (current), 2012 Ferrari California (current)
 

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Mileage was clearly never a factor for me, so why should range be one now?[img= class=inlineimg]https://www.i-paceforum.com/forum/images/I-PaceForum/smilies/tango_face_grin.png[/img]
Well, it takes no more than 5 minutes to go from empty to full in any of those other cars versus 90 minutes (at best) with the I Pace. So it isn’t really much of a comparison...unless of course you never travel more than 180 miles at a time.
 

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Well, it takes no more than 5 minutes to go from empty to full in any of those other cars versus 90 minutes (at best) with the I Pace. So it isn’t really much of a comparison...unless of course you never travel more than 180 miles at a time.
This is true about all EVs, but efficiency (MPG or MPGe) is quite different than refueling time - how often is empty to full truly a requirement? Plus, it's really that last 20% that slows you down: Tesla supercharger is 40 min to 80%, JLR reports 45min for 0-80% DC fast charge of iPace. Check out this YouTube Video where someone achieved a
. I only drive more than 100mi/day a small handful of times per year, and overnight garage charging is ideal, so going EV works for me. I'm also certain there will be improvements in the tech that reduce "fast charge" times.

My point was to address the recent "negative" press on how "less efficient" the iPace is vs. its EV 'competition'... I'm not going to choose a car based on a minor difference in efficiency, whether measured in MPG or MPGe. Style, utility, quality, and features are far more important. If I had a 100+ mi daily commute I might feel differently, but I calculate by going EV I'm going from about $0.24/mi to $0.04/mi in "fuel" cost (80% cost reduction, even ignoring the ZERO emissions factor!), so that last 10-20% of efficiency - say from 75MPGe (iPace rating) to 89 or 92 (the MX ratings) is of little influence on my choice. I suspect the same logic holds for most others considering a car in this price range.
 

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1970 Mach I Mustang
1965 Dodge Coronet
1985 Honda VF500C
1987 Chevy Sprint
1985 Chevy S10
2001 F150 (still have)
2011 LEAF
2014 RAV4-EV
2019 I-Pace
 

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This is true about all EVs, but efficiency (MPG or MPGe) is quite different than refueling time - how often is empty to full truly a requirement? Plus, it's really that last 20% that slows you down: Tesla supercharger is 40 min to 80%, JLR reports 45min for 0-80% DC fast charge of iPace. Check out this YouTube Video where someone achieved a 3% to 50% iPace charge in 26 min. I only drive more than 100mi/day a small handful of times per year, and overnight garage charging is ideal, so going EV works for me. I'm also certain there will be improvements in the tech that reduce "fast charge" times.

My point was to address the recent "negative" press on how "less efficient" the iPace is vs. its EV 'competition'... I'm not going to choose a car based on a minor difference in efficiency, whether measured in MPG or MPGe. Style, utility, quality, and features are far more important. If I had a 100+ mi daily commute I might feel differently, but I calculate by going EV I'm going from about $0.24/mi to $0.04/mi in "fuel" cost (80% cost reduction, even ignoring the ZERO emissions factor!), so that last 10-20% of efficiency - say from 75MPGe (iPace rating) to 89 or 92 (the MX ratings) is of little influence on my choice. I suspect the same logic holds for most others considering a car in this price range.
and my point is in order for EV's to become good enough to replace what we (the general motor vehicle driving public) currently drive, they need to overcome the definitive disadvantage of being able to easily travel distances greater than 150-200 miles. Which in time I have no doubt will happen, just not quite yet & pretending it isn't a problem isn't helpful to anyone. Addressing the negative press by trying to claim it isn't a negative doesn't really address the deficiency at all.

Although the general refrain amongst the EV crowd continues to insist 'it doesn't matter' because '80 miles is the average distance people drive', the truth is it DOES matter. Maybe not to you personally or the tiny slice of current EV users that attempt to justify this deficiency by claiming when it does matter they have a different car to use, but to the general driving public it is a problem. Ignoring it or explaining it away doesn't change it. Why is it so hard for EV enthusiasts to say "hey, this is a problem that needs to be fixed and it is being addressed but yes, right now a serious shortcoming of the car is the ability to easily and quickly travel long distances?"

As for the statement '...same logic holds for most others considering a car in this price range.", I disagree. Find a person that is trying to decide if he should buy a a BMW X5 or a MB GLE. Tell him the X5 has a 3 gallon gas tank, but it isn't a problem because the average daily trip is less than 80 miles...even if you promised to have an elf come over and top it off every night, but if he wants to take a trip in it, he is on his own and must fill the car with a turkey baster. How many do you suspect will stick with the X5, ?

BTW - no I Pace in the US can get to 80% in 40 minutes...yet. But even when it can, that is at least 35 minutes longer than it would take to fill up a Land Rover...
 

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Just to provide another data point... We had a Tesla P90D. Just for fun, we drove it from Charleston, SC to Port Canaveral a couple of times for cruises. It wasn't too painful, but it wasn't easy either. We laid over one night in St. Augustine on both trips. Looking back on the adventure scares the sh*t out of me after the car had a complete meltdown 200+ miles from the nearest Tesla service center at a different time and place. I would never do a 200+ mile trip again in a vehicle that didn't have access to nearby service centers for repairs and even tire problems. IMHO driving range is the least of your worries with both a Tesla and the I-Pace. I'm much more concerned about tires, service centers, and how much pain would accompany even a fender-bender type of accident. If you've read anything about the problems with body shop repairs on a Tesla, you won't be worrying again about 200 miles of EV range. That's the least of your potential problems with any new electric vehicle.
 

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Just to provide another data point... We had a Tesla P90D. Just for fun, we drove it from Charleston, SC to Port Canaveral a couple of times for cruises. It wasn't too painful, but it wasn't easy either. We laid over one night in St. Augustine on both trips. Looking back on the adventure scares the sh*t out of me after the car had a complete meltdown 200+ miles from the nearest Tesla service center at a different time and place. I would never do a 200+ mile trip again in a vehicle that didn't have access to nearby service centers for repairs and even tire problems. IMHO driving range is the least of your worries with both a Tesla and the I-Pace. I'm much more concerned about tires, service centers, and how much pain would accompany even a fender-bender type of accident. If you've read anything about the problems with body shop repairs on a Tesla, you won't be worrying again about 200 miles of EV range. That's the least of your potential problems with any new electric vehicle.
Couldn’t disagree more. I can count on one hand the number of times I have had repair issues of any kind while traveling in the last 40 years. It is such a rare and unlikely event that I wouldn’t even spend a few seconds thinking about it, let alone worrying about it.

I regularly drive greater than 200 miles in a day and often without necessarily planning to. So naturally having a vehicle that can’t easily do that kinda sucks.

Furthermore, I’ve owned BMW, Saab, Smart, Moto Guzzi, Buell, Ural and this Jaguar and none of them have a dealer closer than 250 miles from my house...
 

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Just to provide another data point... We had a Tesla P90D. Just for fun, we drove it from Charleston, SC to Port Canaveral a couple of times for cruises. It wasn't too painful, but it wasn't easy either. We laid over one night in St. Augustine on both trips. Looking back on the adventure scares the sh*t out of me after the car had a complete meltdown 200+ miles from the nearest Tesla service center at a different time and place. I would never do a 200+ mile trip again in a vehicle that didn't have access to nearby service centers for repairs and even tire problems. IMHO driving range is the least of your worries with both a Tesla and the I-Pace. I'm much more concerned about tires, service centers, and how much pain would accompany even a fender-bender type of accident. If you've read anything about the problems with body shop repairs on a Tesla, you won't be worrying again about 200 miles of EV range. That's the least of your potential problems with any new electric vehicle.
btw - I apologize if it came across as me minimizing your concerns. Our own history and the perceptions that come from that, shape what is important to each of us. Nothing wrong with the desire to have a dealer in your backyard, it is just not any where in my list of what’s important. It isn’t my place to critique your list
 

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There is another side to the coin. There is a chart that shows that % of the public and the number of daily miles driven. The curve goes up on a reasonably steep slope to the point where it shows that 60% of people drive 50 or fewer miles a day. And, then after that, the curve flattens markedly. So, at 60 miles a day, it's 62%. At 70 miles a day, another 1 or 2% and so on up to large numbers.

So, going back to the original theme of this thread ... my prior car was a:

2012 Fisker Karma

Which had a 50 mile battery, and a gas engine that was essentially a giant gas generator to charge the battery back up as you cruise. So, it was an electric car on "most days" and a gas car on longer trips. It picked that number of miles for the battery size precisely because of that chart. They could have put a bigger battery in (in 2012) but - why? When it would get only a few more % of people.

So, those who do drive many times a year beyond the nightly charging range (maybe 150 miles), this would clearly be a problem. But, the reality is that this is **** few people.

So, for most of us - We can leave home every day with 100% (or 80%) and not spend the "5 minutes" at a gas station (and the 5 minutes it took to drive there out of my way) 1-2 times a week. That's 520-1040 minutes (9.3-18.7 hours) a year that you get back, and that should be factored against the time you might spend on the rare longer trips you may make.

(P.S. The "censoring" above showing **** frankly makes it seem like I was using much worse language than I actually was ...)
 

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There is another side to the coin. There is a chart that shows that % of the public and the number of daily miles driven. The curve goes up on a reasonably steep slope to the point where it shows that 60% of people drive 50 or fewer miles a day. And, then after that, the curve flattens markedly. So, at 60 miles a day, it's 62%. At 70 miles a day, another 1 or 2% and so on up to large numbers.

So, going back to the original theme of this thread ... my prior car was a:

2012 Fisker Karma

Which had a 50 mile battery, and a gas engine that was essentially a giant gas generator to charge the battery back up as you cruise. So, it was an electric car on "most days" and a gas car on longer trips. It picked that number of miles for the battery size precisely because of that chart. They could have put a bigger battery in (in 2012) but - why? When it would get only a few more % of people.

So, those who do drive many times a year beyond the nightly charging range (maybe 150 miles), this would clearly be a problem. But, the reality is that this is **** few people.

So, for most of us - We can leave home every day with 100% (or 80%) and not spend the "5 minutes" at a gas station (and the 5 minutes it took to drive there out of my way) 1-2 times a week. That's 520-1040 minutes (9.3-18.7 hours) a year that you get back, and that should be factored against the time you might spend on the rare longer trips you may make.

(P.S. The "censoring" above showing **** frankly makes it seem like I was using much worse language than I actually was ...)
Using that 'average' to defend the current poor performance of most EV's is a fallacious argument. I suspect you could build a chart that shows 60% (or more) of people typically drive alone too, but you don't find single seat cars for sale because you wouldn't be able to sell them. A tiny fraction of drivers actually 'use' their four-wheel drive SUVs, as four-wheel drive SUVs, but they sure do sell a lot of them. Also, if you are driving no more than 50 miles a day, it isn't likely you need to fill up even once per week, let alone twice per week. There will not be a big migration from ICEVs to EVs until EVs are competitive on all fronts, two of which are price (they are not close yet) and convenience (they have a long way to go before driving them is as simple & worry free as an ICEV). The advantages bandied about 'it is 'full' every morning' are not big enough advantages to make much of a difference yet. How many people do you recall ever complaining about going to a gas station a couple times per month? If you catch them on a day when the wind is blowing 30 mph and the temp is -25F, they will complain mightily; but then I don't have much room to talk because on a day like that I need to stop at a fast charger for an hour or so if I hope to travel more than 80 or 90 miles...
 

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A lot of other forums do this so I figured I'd start one here.

I'll start -

On the way:
2019 I-Pace FE Corris Grey

Current:
2016 X5 35D M-Sport - Leaving soon
2017 Volvo XC90 Inscription
2003 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 6MT
1974 Alfa Romeo Spider - Survivor

Who is next?
2017 Jaguar f-Pace
2015 Corvette
2013 Nissan Pathfinder
2010 Buick LaCrosse
2008 Toyota Sequoia
2005 Chevy Tahoe
 

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1973: Navy blue 1958 Austin Healey Frog Eyed Sprite soft top. First car
1975: Red 1968 Lancia Flavia convertible designed by Zagato with hard and soft tops. One of only 49 right hand drives ever built. Beautiful car but the rear seat footwell always seemed to have an inexplicable pool of water in it. Never discovered why.

1977: Yellow new Lancia Beta Spyder. Notorious rust bucket.
1978: Red new Lancia Beta Spyder replacement by Lancia for earlier one.

1979: New Green Volvo 245 wagon. Married with 2 kids!!
1982: Used Maroon Mercedes Benz 300TD wagon

1984: New Silver Volvo 260GLE wagon when I emigrated from the UK to US

1985: New White Volkswagen Golf GTI when I re-emigrated back to the UK!

1988: Nearly new Blue BMW 325 wagon. Left behind with wife in 1991

1995: Gold Mercedes Benz 1984 107 class 420SL. Actually strictly speaking my new partner's car

2000: Used Silver Mercedes Benz C200 wagon. Twins arrive from 2nd marriage!!
2004: Used Gold/silver Mercedes Benz E300D wagon
2009: Used Blue Mercedes Benz E350TD wagon
2016: 1 year old Silver Mercedes Benz 350GLE SUV with panoramic roof

2018: October. Sold the Merc to a Jaguar dealer and ordered a Silicon Silver iPace SE with panoramic roof, black wheels and detailing, etc etc. Due for delivery next week. My first EV. Very excited but also in trepidation as to whether I will be one of those with horrible software issues or mercifully not. Neither my wife nor I are techie at all so we want a trouble free, easy to drive, fun car and, as should be obvious, I am looking forward to returning to my sports car roots.
 
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