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Hi,
I'm new to this forum. I recently got my I pace and I'm loving it. The Porsche 911 and the I pace are the two most fun cars I have ever driven. My only issue has been that my range (fully charged) has been consistently below my expectations. The weather has been chilly (but not super cold) 30's 40's Fahrenheit. I am a pretty average driver - in terms of speed, acceleration...etc. I keep regenerative braking on.

My range (fully charged) has never been above 200 and generally closer to 180 (has gotten as low as 170 fully charged) . Is this what other people are finding as well? I know I can increase this if I drive like a granny or don't use any accessories... but who buys an I pace to drive like that.

Also, Jaguar guarantees the batteries will retain 70% state of health over 8 years. Does anyone know to to check the current "state of health" of their battery?

I look forward to sharing experiences with all of you.
 

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I think it is probably normal for the conditions. Precondition setting may help. Normal EPA range should be seen as temperatures get closer to 80 during the day.

Is the 40 during the day? or the overnight low?

I am not going to worry about the capacity until I only get 165 miles showing on a warm day. I expect that to be a long way off.
 

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Hi,
I'm new to this forum. I recently got my I pace and I'm loving it. The Porsche 911 and the I pace are the two most fun cars I have ever driven. My only issue has been that my range (fully charged) has been consistently below my expectations. The weather has been chilly (but not super cold) 30's 40's Fahrenheit. I am a pretty average driver - in terms of speed, acceleration...etc. I keep regenerative braking on.

My range (fully charged) has never been above 200 and generally closer to 180 (has gotten as low as 170 fully charged) . Is this what other people are finding as well? I know I can increase this if I drive like a granny or don't use any accessories... but who buys an I pace to drive like that.

Also, Jaguar guarantees the batteries will retain 70% state of health over 8 years. Does anyone know to to check the current "state of health" of their battery?

I look forward to sharing experiences with all of you.
There are some who say they get much better than that. But your results seem rather typical.
 

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I think it is probably normal for the conditions. Precondition setting may help. Normal EPA range should be seen as temperatures get closer to 80 during the day.

Is the 40 during the day? or the overnight low?

I am not going to worry about the capacity until I only get 165 miles showing on a warm day. I expect that to be a long way off.
180 to 190 with some buffer seems about right.
My last long drive was 60% freeway 75 to 80 mph on freeway, with remaining average speeds through signal light controlled driving 35 mph to 55 mph zones. Total distance was about 193 miles and my guess o meter showed 25 estimated miles left when I got back home. Temps here in Florida were low 70's. Car was in comfort mode with moderate climate requirements for cooling. I'm running on 20" tires, which provide "slightly" better range.

I think you can comfortably get 180 miles with sporty driving. If I've been running a little less aggressive, my charge to full will say 234 to 240 miles. Normally when I charge to full in anticipation of a longer drive, it'll show 210 to 212 based upon prior driving which is normally not granny level :)
 
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When driven to enjoy the car, that's about right.

The big question is, is it enough range for your lifestyle?

This is true for all EVs. Some folk are happy with a Leaf year round. Some are unhappy with Model S 100D's winter range.

The 70% number is something that can be tested with a dealer tool. Tesla has now added the 70% number to their warranty. It use to be 'failure only', not capacity.
 

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BTW - You cannot turn regen off on an I-Pace. Even at 100% charge there is some regen. Lifting the accelerator generates up to 1/2 the regen. The brake pedal generates the rest. Watch the Power Gauge in your instrument cluster when you hit the brakes.
 

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Yes, you're right. I meant that I keep it on "high" instead of "low"
In my experiments, it seems my best range is using Low Regen and Creep Off. But my most fun is High Regen so I can do 'one-pedal-driving'. Creep is a matter of taste.

If you loan the car out, or want somebody to test drive it who is not an EV person, setting it to Low and Creep On will make it easier for them. It feels more like a conventional automatic trans car.
 

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Interesting. Does anyone else get better range with regen on low?
 

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I set mine on low for a couple weeks and it made no noticeable difference
Yes, best range is with low regeneration and creep turned off. You coast a bit better on low. Creep uses a bit with stop and go traffic. Throw in ECO mode if the weather is mild. Should get you the best range with more normal driving.
 

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The cold weather affects range substantially, so if you're in the 30s/40s you're doing well to show 180-190 range. Highway driving also detracts from range (more power to fight the wind). I personally don't care for high regen, too hard to not rock my passengers forward and back. Frankly I wish I could turn regen completely off, especially on highway drives. One thing to note, you will not get any regen with the car above a 90% state of charge... as a safety measure to not overcharge the battery.
 

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Regen can certainly be moderated with the throttle. I prefer high. Although a mid level might be OK also. Low is weak but would work better if it had a high button on the steering like the Bolt.
 

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All Low does is remap some regen from the right pedal to the left pedal. Why it can save energy:

1) Driving without touching the brake requires a more gentle style using Low.
2) It's easier to modulate pressure by pushing than lifting. You are less likely to use more regen than necessary.

But, a well-trained foot could match it in High. It's unlikely to beat it though.

Cruise Control also uses more power per mile. A skilled driver will use less peak kW in both directions than the ACC will.
 
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The cold weather affects range substantially, so if you're in the 30s/40s you're doing well to show 180-190 range. Highway driving also detracts from range (more power to fight the wind). I personally don't care for high regen, too hard to not rock my passengers forward and back. Frankly I wish I could turn regen completely off, especially on highway drives. One thing to note, you will not get any regen with the car above a 90% state of charge... as a safety measure to not overcharge the battery.
You have limited regen based on battery temp. There is a green line that appears on the regen side of the power dial. This is the regen limit when at a high charge level. The green line will disappear anywhere from 88% to 95% charge and AFAIK is just temperature based. On colder days, it nerfs the regen longer than warmer days.
 

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I drove 132mi at high speed (75-80mph) to and from the airport today to spend the day in Houston. No traffic either way: left 5am, arrived home at 11pm. Left in AM with 97%, 212 mi range showing. Traveled 132mi roundtrip, used cruise/lane control most of the way, mild use of AC and seat warmers, iPhone plugged in with radio on, so really 'typical' use - no effort made to 'conserve' power. Got home tonight with 19%, 32mi range showing. These numbers suggest range of ~170mi when driving at 75-80mph with temps in the low 70s. I didn't charge at the airport to make the calculations easier and more 'absolute', but could easily have done so for free. Knowing I don't *have* to charge to make it home is comforting should the dozen or so charging stations ever be full.
 

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All Low does is remap some regen from the right pedal to the left pedal. Why it can save energy:

1) Driving without touching the brake requires a more gentle style using Low.
2) It's easier to modulate pressure by pushing than lifting. You are less likely to use more regen than necessary.

But, a well-trained foot could match it in High. It's unlikely to beat it though.

Cruise Control also uses more power per mile. A skilled driver will use less peak kW in both directions than the ACC will.
I'm not sure I understand why cruise control uses more power (unless you're driving in mountains). Surely maintaining an absolutely steady speed is better? Please educate me - I don't get my I Pace until March.
 
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