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Btw battery pre conditioning is a bit different than cabin preconditioning. Battery pre conditioning usually takes a few hours based on size of battery, so try setting a departure time on a cold day with the car plugged into a level 2 charger, check tires and do another range test.

I would expect with careful driving you should hit 170 miles.
 

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Btw battery pre conditioning is a bit different than cabin preconditioning. Battery pre conditioning usually takes a few hours based on size of battery, so try setting a departure time on a cold day with the car plugged into a level 2 charger, check tires and do another range test.

I would expect with careful driving you should hit 170 miles.
Careful driving is what? No heat or a/c or radio at speeds less than 55-60 on a freeway? And then hopefully getting 170 miles? That’s just unacceptable and nowhere near stated range estimate. I’ve read through all comments in the Clean Techina article, it seems the only unknown Dantrium has is tire pressure which some say should be higher. I would also guess as his car was parked in the showroom it was plugged in until he left.
 

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Btw battery pre conditioning is a bit different than cabin preconditioning. Battery pre conditioning usually takes a few hours based on size of battery, so try setting a departure time on a cold day with the car plugged into a level 2 charger, check tires and do another range test.

I would expect with careful driving you should hit 170 miles.
Do you have your I-Pace? What range are you receiving?
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I am betting besides subsidies Norwegians may actually want electric cars. Money isn’t the only consideration for people. If it was we would all be driving Kia Souls.
Norwegians buy tons of electric cars, while Swedes and Finns do not.
Norway heavily subsidizes electric cars, while Sweden and Finland do not.

Yeah, you're probably right, there's no connection between consumer behavior and giant piles of taxpayer subsidies. Norwegians just "want" electric cars. What the **** is wrong with those **** Swedes and Finns?
 

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Careful driving is acceleration/deceleration, it really makes a big difference. That is in addition to the cold temperature factor.

The test cycle range is really not indicative of worst case scenario, rather "typical." So yes it is a bit of a surprise if you have now owned electric cars about the hit they take in the cold. The stated 234 mile range is probably is 60-70F, driving moderately and I am guessing no more than 60 mph.

Another factor really is elevation changes, climbing and even descending to same level can reduce your range. So can head wind, snow on the ground and yes even rain on the road. These factors apply to all cars, we just don't notice as much when we can simply drive up and fill up in 5 minutes.

Its an unfortunate truth of batteries and electric cars, that is why I for one really think hydrogen fuel cells where electric cars can "refill" quickly is the ideal model, but we are not there in technology and in the US I fear we will NEVER have the infrastructure.

Do you have your I-Pace? What range are you receiving?
No, mine is still sitting in the port of Baltimore and every update I get is bogus, if I had I would have run some real life tests. I honestly have a lot of experience with a lot of different electric vehicles. For example today on my Bolt I was getting around 220 mile real life range in 45F, heat off, seat warmer on and driving carefully. That was after living the car plugged in all night in a warm garage so battery was at temperature and preconditioning the cabin. The batteries have a large thermal mass, so if they are cold it takes a long time to warm up and if they are warm it takes a while to cool down.
 

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Careful driving is acceleration/deceleration, it really makes a big difference. That is in addition to the cold temperature factor.

The test cycle range is really not indicative of worst case scenario, rather "typical." So yes it is a bit of a surprise if you have now owned electric cars about the hit they take in the cold. The stated 234 mile range is probably is 60-70F, driving moderately and I am guessing no more than 60 mph.

Another factor really is elevation changes, climbing and even descending to same level can reduce your range. So can head wind, snow on the ground and yes even rain on the road. These factors apply to all cars, we just don't notice as much when we can simply drive up and fill up in 5 minutes.

Its an unfortunate truth of batteries and electric cars, that is why I for one really think hydrogen fuel cells where electric cars can "refill" quickly is the ideal model, but we are not there in technology and in the US I fear we will NEVER have the infrastructure.

Do you have your I-Pace? What range are you receiving?
No, mine is still sitting in the port of Baltimore and every update I get is bogus, if I had I would have run some real life tests. I honestly have a lot of experience with a lot of different electric vehicles. For example today on my Bolt I was getting around 220 mile real life range in 45F, heat off, seat warmer on and driving carefully. That was after living the car plugged in all night in a warm garage so battery was at temperature and preconditioning the cabin. The batteries have a large thermal mass, so if they are cold it takes a long time to warm up and if they are warm it takes a while to cool down.
I will be interested in knowing what you actually get versus what you think it should get. I couldn’t have been more careful with the acceleration/decelerations and the elevation changes in my part of the country are negligible. Reading about the I-Pace for the last several months it seemed the 225-250 mile range was ‘normal’. Now it seems everyone is starting to say 170-180 is reasonable...that’s crazy.
 

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I will be interested in knowing what you actually get versus what you think it should get. I couldn’t have been more careful with the acceleration/decelerations and the elevation changes in my part of the country are negligible. Reading about the I-Pace for the last several months it seemed the 225-250 mile range was ‘normal’. Now it seems everyone is starting to say 170-180 is reasonable...that’s crazy.
Will do, if I get mine before I go away for a long trip, at this point it looks unlikely. From my experience I never expected anywhere near 240, but more in the 170-180 range. The test cycle should be improved OR the manufacturer should really set expectations well.

But I will tell you that the dealers have no clue about the car at all, much less anything useful like real life range, so they wouldn't be useful.
 

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I will be interested in knowing what you actually get versus what you think it should get. I couldn’t have been more careful with the acceleration/decelerations and the elevation changes in my part of the country are negligible. Reading about the I-Pace for the last several months it seemed the 225-250 mile range was ‘normal’. Now it seems everyone is starting to say 170-180 is reasonable...that’s crazy.
Will do, if I get mine before I go away for a long trip, at this point it looks unlikely. From my experience I never expected anywhere near 240, but more in the 170-180 range. The test cycle should be improved OR the manufacturer should really set expectations well.

But I will tell you that the dealers have no clue about the car at all, much less anything useful like real life range, so they wouldn't be useful.
The folks I know driving Tesla’s don’t seem to expect or get a range nearly 30% less than what is estimated...you are getting pretty close to the Bolt’s range. What makes you say a 30% drop in the I-Pace is reasonable?
 

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Discussion Starter #50
The folks I know driving Tesla’s don’t seem to expect or get a range nearly 30% less than what is estimated...you are getting pretty close to the Bolt’s range. What makes you say a 30% drop in the I-Pace is reasonable?
EVs get way less mileage in cold weather. Teslas, Bolts, and all others. A 30% drop or more is common, depending on the temperature. This is well known.
 

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EVs get way less mileage in cold weather. Teslas, Bolts, and all others. A 30% drop or more is common, depending on the temperature. This is well known.
+1 on this.

Stated range is closer to 70F to 85F. I do recommend using seat heaters only, increasing tire pressure to near sidewall max, and 62mph max if range is critical.
Even if I-Pace has a heat pump... in extreme cold there will be a resistance heater that really sucks the power.

Must also know your charging stops in advance. Fast energy is not on every corner yet.

All normal from any EV veteran.
 

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Teslas definitely lose range in the cold. Bolt is the only EV I know that will by design actively heat the battery to get more capacity. Most only have protection circuits that kick in to prevent damage for battery from extreme cold. The preconditioning in some is meant to heat battery to give more range (like Leaf) but Bolt will apparently do more than that.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Teslas definitely lose range in the cold. Bolt is the only EV I know that will by design actively heat the battery to get more capacity. Most only have protection circuits that kick in to prevent damage for battery from extreme cold. The preconditioning in some is meant to heat battery to give more range (like Leaf) but Bolt will apparently do more than that.
I never knew the Bolt did that. Living in California, I suppose I don't need to care.

But it sounds very easy to do. If it works, why aren't Nissan, Tesla and the others doing the same thing?
 

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I'm driving my I-Pace for 4 weeks now. 210Miles (350km) is very realistic (20% high way 80% city).

Outside temperature was between 5-20 degrees (in this period) and I'm using the car without restrictions: comfort-setting/radio/seat- and wheel-heating.

I'm not sure how the range will be influenced when the temperature drops below zero though.
 

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I never knew the Bolt did that. Living in California, I suppose I don't need to care.

But it sounds very easy to do. If it works, why aren't Nissan, Tesla and the others doing the same thing?
You have to have the correct kind of heating elements I believe, all of them use ones to prevent freezing in very cold temperature and battery damage. BMW also does pre-conditioning that will raise the temperature in cold weather while still plugged in for same. But I believe Bolt may the only one that may do it just to gain capacity while not plugged in during cold. The issue is efficiency, the power it takes to warm the battery has to be less than capacity gained if you are not plugged in and using shore power.

Whatever it is the Bolt shows the LEAST capacity drop in the cold of any of my electric vehicles so far.
 

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Can I assume you're quoting temperatures in degrees F? Not knowing where you're located makes it hard to guess!
More likely Celsius if he is getting that much range. Others say you should expect a 30% loss in cold weather and the Jaguar rep told my dealer that I shouldn't expect more than mid 100's for our part of the country (temps have been teens/20s F) and I am lucky if I can get 150.
 

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That's 168 miles driving in the city. Your city must be very large!
168 miles on multiple trips. Most of them are short trips in the City (6-20 miles). If it would be 1 trip range would be higher. The highest consumption is alway's first trip of the day. Possible because of a cold battery.
 
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