Jaguar I-Pace EV400 Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I find my Jaguar I pace only chargers ever to about 220 miles, versus 300 miles claimed and only travels 150 miles.

The car is so poor, it has been back to garage twice, reprogrammed twice, still only 220 miles charge and only travels 150 miles, no ac, eco mode, cab heating off, less than 70 mph etc

Now Jaguar say they do not guarantee the Range of the car.
Is this other people’s experience ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
First step: ignore the rated range (WLTP especially) and the car's computed distance-to-empty range, both numbers are borderline meaningless.

The only number that really matters is your actual driven range, which at 150 miles is indeed lower than expected. While Jaguar do not guarantee a range, they do guarantee battery health. Unfortunately the I-pace seems to fail silently and not report bad battery modules, so it's up to you (and us) to prove that you have a bad battery by tracking energy added and consumed vs. distance driven. Others on this forum have been able to do so and successfully get JLR to admit the battery was bad and in need of repair or replacement (in at least one case they agree to buy back the car when they could not satisfactorily repair the battery).

Do you have a charger that lets you see how much energy is added to the car during each charge session? If not, do you have an Android device on which you can install WattCat?

If you are able, start recording the amount of energy you add in each charging session, along with the miles driven between each charge, and the change in the state of charge (the reported battery percent remaining) between charging sessions.


For example: my last set of numbers looked like this:

Previous charge ending SOC: 100%
Charge start SOC: 41%
Charge end SOC: 100%
Charge kWh added: 55
Miles driven since previous charge: 132.5

From this I calculate that I consumed 59% of my state of charge (I started at 100% and drove down to 41%) to go 132.5 miles. 132.5 miles/0.59 = 224 miles, which is the estimate of what my total range might have been had I driven down to 0%. This looks good and is in line with my expectations for the local weather, etc.

I can also calculate that I added 55 kWh to restore 59% of my battery's state of charge. 55 kWh/0.59 = 93 kWh, which is an estimate of the total capacity of my battery. This is more than the actual capacity of the battery, but there are losses in charging (more power leaves the charger than enters the battery), I had cabin pre-heating configured, and it's at least close enough to make me feel comfortable that my battery is OK.

If you post your actual numbers we can help you assess them. My guess is your calculated total battery capacity will be low based on what you posted, indicating failed modules.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Im getting between 270 to 330mi depending how I drive & terrain.
I am in California so our weather is idea for EVs, but I still get very good range
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,719 Posts
PS, really? That must be in town only ...

I'm now getting 260 mile range based on in town trips only, at close to ideal battery temps. These are actual measurements, not GoM or the trip meter's reported consumption.

On my drive home from LA, going an average of 66 mph with many miles at 79 or 83 mph, I got 160 miles. Which is what one would expect given the exponential increase of wind resistance with speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
My GOM consistently says about 220 miles based upon my daily driving habits. When I do some regular, long weekend drives with speeds consistently around 80 mph, I get between 190 and 200 total actual miles driven. To get above the 200 real miles, I need to do more around town driving and be in the 55 mph range for about half the time. Then we are looking at 220 to 240 real miles.

Point is that every persons real miles will differ depending upon terrain, speed (average), temperature. If 150 is the real range and you are not going up hill the entire time, I would follow KKemps advice to track actual energy usage and actual distance so that you can get your battery modules analyzed. Others on forum have required repairs. If all you can squeeze out is about 150 real miles on a full charge, it smells like a battery module failure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Driven aggressively before the H264 range boost, I'd get about 200 miles of range. Driven at the speed limit, always over 240 actual range.
Do not blindly trust any automotive range estimator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
My GOM consistently says about 220 miles based upon my daily driving habits. When I do some regular, long weekend drives with speeds consistently around 80 mph, I get between 190 and 200 total actual miles driven. To get above the 200 real miles, I need to do more around town driving and be in the 55 mph range for about half the time. Then we are looking at 220 to 240 real miles.

Point is that every persons real miles will differ depending upon terrain, speed (average), temperature. If 150 is the real range and you are not going up hill the entire time, I would follow KKemps advice to track actual energy usage and actual distance so that you can get your battery modules analyzed. Others on forum have required repairs. If all you can squeeze out is about 150 real miles on a full charge, it smells like a battery module failure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for taking the time for this hopeful reply, all is not lost . I will do KKemps analysis on the battery. Ralph Doy uk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
My GOM shows 225 after the H264 update on a full charge. The very first time after the software update, it showed 260 but it was showing 225 afterward consistently. When I calculate it's like 200 miles that I can drive based on energy consumption from my juicebox app. 65% of the time around 70 miles/hr with temp around 35-55 F.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
T
Thank you for your reply, Iam checking the car out as we speak, great information , many thanks
Ralph Doy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
First step: ignore the rated range (WLTP especially) and the car's computed distance-to-empty range, both numbers are borderline meaningless.

The only number that really matters is your actual driven range, which at 150 miles is indeed lower than expected. While Jaguar do not guarantee a range, they do guarantee battery health. Unfortunately the I-pace seems to fail silently and not report bad battery modules, so it's up to you (and us) to prove that you have a bad battery by tracking energy added and consumed vs. distance driven. Others on this forum have been able to do so and successfully get JLR to admit the battery was bad and in need of repair or replacement (in at least one case they agree to buy back the car when they could not satisfactorily repair the battery).

Do you have a charger that lets you see how much energy is added to the car during each charge session? If not, do you have an Android device on which you can install WattCat?

If you are able, start recording the amount of energy you add in each charging session, along with the miles driven between each charge, and the change in the state of charge (the reported battery percent remaining) between charging sessions.


For example: my last set of numbers looked like this:

Previous charge ending SOC: 100%
Charge start SOC: 41%
Charge end SOC: 100%
Charge kWh added: 55
Miles driven since previous charge: 132.5

From this I calculate that I consumed 59% of my state of charge (I started at 100% and drove down to 41%) to go 132.5 miles. 132.5 miles/0.59 = 224 miles, which is the estimate of what my total range might have been had I driven down to 0%. This looks good and is in line with my expectations for the local weather, etc.

I can also calculate that I added 55 kWh to restore 59% of my battery's state of charge. 55 kWh/0.59 = 93 kWh, which is an estimate of the total capacity of my battery. This is more than the actual capacity of the battery, but there are losses in charging (more power leaves the charger than enters the battery), I had cabin pre-heating configured, and it's at least close enough to make me feel comfortable that my battery is OK.

If you post your actual numbers we can help you assess them. My guess is your calculated total battery capacity will be low based on what you posted, indicating failed modules.
Many thanks for the quantifiable reply , really helpfull. Iam just checking out the car, with the method you have outlined, I will let you know the results, thank you
Ralph Doy
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top