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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, first post here one day before taking my I-Pace test drive. I'm quite excited and I'm pretty sure I'll be signing on the dotted line tomorrow too.

With that said, I've got a question on what DC Fast Chargers can be used with the I-Pace and what, if any, extra connectors are required. I know EVGo, Electrify America & Charge Point are the biggies. I'm coming from a Tesla Model S which I'll be trading, so my charging experience is only limited to home & SuperChargers.

The second question is for those of you that have either come from a Model S (or still own one) and how it compares to the I-Pace in terms of ride & handling. I've got the air suspension, but still find it a rather hard ride. I won't go into Tesla's fit & finish or rattle-prone contraction, I'm sure many of you are aware of it already.

Thanks for your help and I look forward to joining the community here!
 

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Woohoo, welcome!
Here's a primer on charging:

Be ready for slower charging than with your Tesla. The connector on your I-Pace is CCS for DCFC and the 'subset' plug J-1772 for Level 2 charging.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Woohoo, welcome!
Here's a primer on charging:

Be ready for slower charging than with your Tesla. The connector on your I-Pace is CCS for DCFC and the 'subset' plug J-1772 for Level 2 charging.
Thanks, that primer helped a lot! Since I've got a late 2017 Model S75, it was already being throttled at the SC for quite some time. Estimated times on the Tesla since the throttling, have been a joke. I went to a SC a few days ago showing about 50 miles remaining on a 230 mile full charge range. To get to 90%, it showed about 35 minutes...not even close to reality. 1 hour and 10 minutes later I was at 210 miles at which point I stopped. I'm not sure how that compares to DCFC for the I-Pace.

Charging at home nets me about 32 miles/hour on a 240v/50a circuit on the Tesla portable charger (not hard wired home station). I'm assuming the I-Pace will be slower, but will it be that much slower?
 

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I'm not sure how that compares to DCFC for the I-Pace.
On a typical 50kW Chargepoint charger you'll be at the station for an hour for 5/8 of battery capacity, approximately.
On an EA station where your I-Pace can start off at 70 or 80 kW depending on where you start it's a bit faster for a while, but at about 40% it will start throttling down to 50kW (reached at about 70%) and then more slowly. On a typical road trip expect to spend an hour at each charging stop. That said, I've found it to be not a big deal; it's all about expectations and planning.

Charging at home nets me about 32 miles/hour on a 240v/50a circuit on the Tesla portable charger (not hard wired home station). I'm assuming the I-Pace will be slower, but will it be that much slower?
I don't know if that Tesla charger will work on the I-Pace; I kinda think it won't. If it doesn't, I highly recommend installing a proper 240V/50Amp circuit and getting a ChargePoint home charger that will charge at 7.2 kW (240V/32Amp), which is the I-Pace's limit for Level 2. Be prepared for a somewhat less seamless experience than with the Tesla but if you can get over minor annoyances (like the throttling that happens when cells are being balanced even on a Level 2 charger) you'll be ok. Also, there's a useful Android app called WattCat that helps a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
On a typical 50kW Chargepoint charger you'll be at the station for an hour for 5/8 of battery capacity, approximately.
On an EA station where your I-Pace can start off at 70 or 80 kW depending on where you start it's a bit faster for a while, but at about 40% it will start throttling down to 50kW (reached at about 70%) and then more slowly. On a typical road trip expect to spend an hour at each charging stop. That said, I've found it to be not a big deal; it's all about expectations and planning.
Interestingly, from where I currently am with my MS, that's not too much different in terms of time. Yes, a little slower, but not a biggie.


I don't know if that Tesla charger will work on the I-Pace; I kinda think it won't. If it doesn't, I highly recommend installing a proper 240V/50Amp circuit and getting a ChargePoint home charger that will charge at 7.2 kW (240V/32Amp), which is the I-Pace's limit for Level 2. Be prepared for a somewhat less seamless experience than with the Tesla but if you can get over minor annoyances (like the throttling that happens when cells are being balanced even on a Level 2 charger) you'll be ok. Also, there's a useful Android app called WattCat that helps a lot.
Not a problem. I've got a 40amp Juice Box Pro that should work fine unless there's some compelling reason to go with the ChargePoint unit. I'll need to give the Tesla charger to the dealer anyway. Interestingly my utility is offering $500 toward the purchase of a new charger, and the new variable output ChargePoint unit is one of them. I already bought the Juice Box Pro with that offer last year, but they'll buy you another charger in a different calendar year! The ChargePoint unit is going for $650, so $150 out of pocket.

BTW, I stand corrected, the Tesla circuit is on a 50amp line. I've got a second NEMA 14-50 outlet on a 40amp line.
 

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I have a Joicebox Pro 40 and it works just fine. It is capable of providing the maximum charging capability of the I-pace.

I frequently use Chargepoint DCFC chargers in the area. They're all 50kW vesions. I charge my I-pace from 15-20% to 100% in about 2 hours. That last 1/2 hour is usually the charging from 90 to 100%. I endure the wait because the charging is free at the locations I stop at. :). Then I'll drive home and use the Juicebox to get it back to 100% to allow the battery balancing to work.

I've also used EA and EVgo locations without any problems (except to the wallet by comparison).
 

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I have a Joicebox Pro 40 and it works just fine. It is capable of providing the maximum charging capability of the I-pace.

I frequently use Chargepoint DCFC chargers in the area. They're all 50kW vesions. I charge my I-pace from 15-20% to 100% in about 2 hours. That last 1/2 hour is usually the charging from 90 to 100%. I endure the wait because the charging is free at the locations I stop at. :). Then I'll drive home and use the Juicebox to get it back to 100% to allow the battery balancing to work.

I've also used EA and EVgo locations without any problems (except to the wallet by comparison).
Can I ask where you're located? Also, how often does that battery balancing take place?
 

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I don't think mostly fast charging is a good idea ... it's detrimental to battery life. Better to charge Level 2 most of the time. 🍺
 

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Mid-OH is where I travel most. 50kW charging (actually is more like 41-46 and tapers to less after reaching 80-85%) is not considered fast charging per Jaguar engineer in a previous posting, so I'm not too concerned.

WattCat is reporting my 100% charge is 86.1kWh at the present time.

The battery balancing will take place every time level 2 charging reaches 100%. It may happen at level 3 charging (but it is at a 5kW rate and less) on a rare occasion when it hits 100% but manages to get the balancing going before the charger reacts and says "You're at 100% and done." That was my experience pre-H264/H280 updates. I haven't had too many opportunities to charge since then due to other viral influences.
 

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Welcome Ken! I'm not a former Tesla owner, but I did want to comment on your question about the ride/handling. The I-Pace ships with its tires overinflated at 50psi to avoid getting "flat spots". Some dealers fail to deflate them upon arrival, but even when they do, they deflate to the "standard" settings of 48psi rear and 40 psi front. For optimal ride, as in NIGHT and DAY difference, set the tires to "TPM - Light Load" on the dash menu (assuming you and just one other passenger are the norm) and inflate tires to just 37psi all around. With 37psi and the air suspension you should love the ride. I'm driving on 22s and the drop in tire pressure was the "magic button" that made all the difference in ride quality. Many others on this forum have experienced the same dramatic change. (Note: the setting on the dash menu is only to avoid the "tire pressure" warning that will occur if they are at 37 while the car is in the "normal mode" setting.)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Welcome Ken! I'm not a former Tesla owner, but I did want to comment on your question about the ride/handling. The I-Pace ships with its tires overinflated at 50psi to avoid getting "flat spots". Some dealers fail to deflate them upon arrival, but even when they do, they deflate to the "standard" settings of 48psi rear and 40 psi front. For optimal ride, as in NIGHT and DAY difference, set the tires to "TPM - Light Load" on the dash menu (assuming you and just one other passenger are the norm) and inflate tires to just 37psi all around. With 37psi and the air suspension you should love the ride. I'm driving on 22s and the drop in tire pressure was the "magic button" that made all the difference in ride quality. Many others on this forum have experienced the same dramatic change. (Note: the setting on the dash menu is only to avoid the "tire pressure" warning that will occur if they are at 37 while the car is in the "normal mode" setting.)
That's great info and I've written down as one of the first things to check! I'm already loving this community. :)
 

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Thanks, very interesting. Having owned a Tesla MS, I was amused by one question about why Tesla is so far ahead on the software side. I can tell he never owned a Tesla. There are many many quirks with Tesla's software. I often need to reboot one or both displays to get something to work properly. As most on the TMC forum say in disgust when Tesla downloads a new software version, "Fix two things, break something else". It's far from perfect. Now not owning an I-Pace yet, maybe it's worse with the Jag, time will tell, but again the Tesla is far from perfect.

The other thing I found interesting and had thought about was the wheel size. The car I'll be test driving in a couple of hours is the SE I selected from the dealer's website. I'm not sure what wheel size it has, but I'm assuming 20s. It seems most SEs come with the 20" wheels. The 18s offer the best range (and ride quality?) as mentioned in the above video, with the 20s offering a compromise between range & 'sportiness' and the 22s offering better looks according to some. I'm not sure what the consensus is here, but maybe some can shed some light on this.

Have people changed 20s for 18s to improve range or are most happy with the 20s? I'm also assuming there needs to be some calibration if you change the original wheel size.
 

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Tesla takes risks other OEMs won't take and figures it out in court down the road.
This makes them seem far ahead of everyone esle. Not that they don't do many things better, but the public perception is a bit skewed.

As far as wheels, the 18s are a far better ride than the 20s and 22s.
Smaller the wheels, better the range, better ride, less road noise, but the bigger the wheels, better it looks
The I-Pace was designed around the 22s. It fills in the wheels well gap perfectly

I would suggest driving cars with all 3 wheels styles in less than perfect roads to get the feel.
I have the 20s, 5068s and Im taking it to the dealer to see why it's such a rough ride. I'm noticing it more now
Per the great advice of @dtgsrq, I even reduced the tires to 36psi and its still a bit rough for me
 

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Tesla takes risks other OEMs won't take and figures it out in court down the road.
This makes them seem far ahead of everyone esle. Not that they don't do many things better, but the public perception is a bit skewed.

As far as wheels, the 18s are a far better ride than the 20s and 22s.
Smaller the wheels, better the range, better ride, less road noise, but the bigger the wheels, better it looks
The I-Pace was designed around the 22s. It fills in the wheels well gap perfectly

I would suggest driving cars with all 3 wheels styles in less than perfect roads to get the feel.
I have the 20s, 5068s and Im taking it to the dealer to see why it's such a rough ride. I'm noticing it more now
Per the great advice of @dtgsrq, I even reduced the tires to 36psi and its still a bit rough for me
Ouch. That's odd in that so many comment on how smooth & comfortable the ride is. Your complaint sounds like what I experience with my Model S. Even with the air suspension the ride is too firm for my liking. Not 'punishing' but just not cushy over bad roads. I think the rattles also make the ride feel worse than it is. Tesla is known for rattles. I have a couple of streets picked out for my test drive that should give me a good idea as to ride quality on whatever wheels the car will have on it.

How do you get to try all these different wheel sizes? I know I would not go with 22s, but rather 20s or 18s. It seems that most feel the 20s are a good compromise. Will most dealers swap wheels on a brand new car? So if the car came with 20s and I wanted 18s (or vice versa), will they cooperate? I've also read that calibration for the different wheel sizes often fails. I assume the calibration is necessary to more accurately predict range and give accurate speed readings.
 

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Ouch. That's odd in that so many comment on how smooth & comfortable the ride is. Your complaint sounds like what I experience with my Model S. Even with the air suspension the ride is too firm for my liking. Not 'punishing' but just not cushy over bad roads. I think the rattles also make the ride feel worse than it is. Tesla is known for rattles. I have a couple of streets picked out for my test drive that should give me a good idea as to ride quality on whatever wheels the car will have on it.
I have the 18" wheels and I run them at 38psi. The ride is supple and not rattly at all even on crappy CA backroads (or on dirt).

How do you get to try all these different wheel sizes? I know I would not go with 22s, but rather 20s or 18s. It seems that most feel the 20s are a good compromise. Will most dealers swap wheels on a brand new car? So if the car came with 20s and I wanted 18s (or vice versa), will they cooperate?
My dealer was not willing to swap wheels so I got online, researched the weight of various aftermarket options, sold the original ones, and bought new ones for less than I sold the old ones for. Jaguar wheels are super expensive, so they fetch a good price when you sell them.

I've also read that calibration for the different wheel sizes often fails. I assume the calibration is necessary to more accurately predict range and give accurate speed readings.
Speed readings are the same because the overall tire diameter is the same. Haha, that brings up another thing you don't yet know about: the GoM! It's crap but it's good enough to give you a sense of how full the tank is, plus there's a gas gauge too.
 

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FWIW I have the 20s and I find the ride pretty smooth. But then again I am used to and like a much firmer ride generally.
 
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