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Today I tested the power draw of various consumers. I had looked at this before but not actually sat down to record all the numbers. Today's numbers are consistent with my previous observations. Caveat: It's a warm day, battery temperature was at 75F, cabin temperature was at about 95 (except when AC was on). Climate readings may look quite different on colder or hotter days, and I did not test the heater or the heated seats, haha. Also, the car was parked, as the OBD tool only reports total power draw and if I had been driving, the drivetrain draw would have obliterated the smaller consumers both in magnitude and in variance.

Car resting and turned on
No matter if it's just the "ignition" or if it's "drive-ready", with all user-controlled consumers off: 0.35 kW
[I subtracted this value from all other measurements, just in case you're wondering]

Media and Screens
Main screen draws somewhere between 0.02 and 0.04 kW, very close to measurement limits.
WiFi, Radio, Media via bluetooth were undetectable within measurement limits, so probably less than 0.02 kW each

Preconditioning
I only tested this for a minute during which it was constant: 4 kW
NB: the super loud fan noise from the front end was on the whole time, Max A/C button was illuminated on the lower screen, and Battery Preconditioning was running according to WattCat. Again note that the battery was at 75F. I'm sure the power draw would be much higher if it were cold or freezing out, but I could not test that.

Climate
Max A/C
bounced wildly between 5 kW and 12 kW. I did not test other A/C settings because cabin climate will vary a lot depending on conditions. The 12kW reading did not last long, I suspect that sustained Max A/C will draw 6kW or so before settling in to 3kW or so when the cabin has been cooled a bit.
Blower only
On 3, driver's seat only smart climate on, just under 0.1 kW. Smart climate off, 0.15 kW
On 7 (highest setting), driver's seat only smart climate on, 0.2 kW. Smart climate off, 0.3 kW
Cooled seats
Highest setting (3). Driver only <0.1 kW, both driver and passenger 0.15 kW. [This is amazing, and consistent with anecdotal observations by others!]
Rear defrost, 0.4 kW

Lights
Headlights, brights close to undetectable, I'd say less than 0.05 kW
Pressing brake about 0.05 kW

Bottom Line
A/C will significantly impact range (yes we knew that); an average power draw of 3 kW would cost you a bit more than 10% SoC on a three-hour drive.
Cooled seats or just the blowers will cost you very little!
Other consumers are negligible.

HTH 馃嵑
 

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Discussion Starter #3
kW is the rate of power draw (or input). If you have a rate of 1 kW, you'll be depleting the charge in your battery by 1 kWh over one hour, 2 kWh over two hours, etc. Multiply the kW number by the number of hours you're interested in and you have the total power consumption in kWh over that time period.

Resistive heating is a serious power hog. I don't recall what it looked like in the winter, so I hesitate to speculate.
 

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Just the other morning, with exterior temp reported at 67F, I had the interior temp set at 71F. I don't know why as I usually have it at 68F. Turned it up to 74F and GOM dropped by 6 miles. I quickly turned it back down to 71F and GOM went back up by 6. Yes, that was just for the smart climate of the driver seat! Further adjustment down closer to exterior temperature improved a GOM a little but I couldn't give an exact number because I had driven some distance. It was obvious that adjusting the interior to match exterior, if tolerable, would extend the range. Cooling or heating from that will impact the range.

Side effect (pun alert) of the smart climate is that my left side can be cooled but the right side will remain warm since the front passenger side goes uncooled. I may have to override smart climate in the hottest of times in order to arrive at my destination as a cool guy.

I have also noted the perception that I feel less hot headed with the sunshade accessory installed and the sun overhead as it is this time of year when the clouds have parted. This may help keep the interior cooler and require less AC draw.

Thank you for the measurements.
 

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kW is the rate of power draw (or input). If you have a rate of 1 kW, you'll be depleting the charge in your battery by 1 kWh over one hour, 2 kWh over two hours, etc. Multiply the kW number by the number of hours you're interested in and you have the total power consumption in kWh over that time period.

Resistive heating is a serious power hog. I don't recall what it looked like in the winter, so I hesitate to speculate.
Just confused with the terminology. So kw means kWh per hour. Kw is the rate and the kWh is the unit for power. It makes sense in this case as symbolically, kWh/h=kw.
I pace uses heat pump and it is supposedly very efficient.
 

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Just confused with the terminology. So kw means kWh per hour. Kw is the rate and the kWh is the unit for power. It makes sense in this case as symbolically, kWh/h=kw.
A kilowatt is a unit of power. For electricity a kilowatt is voltage x amperage. A kilowatt-hour is power usage when looking at your utility bill or power capacity when talking about batteries. In both cases it's power (kW) x time (hr). A 60W light bulb nominally draws 0.06 kW of power. Every hour that light bulb is on represents 0.06 kWh of power usage on your utility bill or would require 0.06 kWh of capacity in a battery backup.

...but yes, kW x hr / hr = kW.
 

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Super helpful, thank you! To be curious, blasting the radio didn't impact usage much at all? Kind of surprising. Might make sense though. I had an XE previously, and there is a significant difference between the 825w Meridien system in that car and the I-PACE. 2 less speakers, but a lot less "oomph" across the mid and low end ranges. Likely to conserve energy.
 

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Resistive heating is a serious power hog. I don't recall what it looked like in the winter, so I hesitate to speculate.
I can't provide the extra consumption of resistive heating in kWh but in my winter tests using the same 37 mile route, time, temperature and driving conditions using Auto climate control at 72掳 increased consumption by 32.6% as compared to driving with climate control off. Using 2 seat heaters and climate control off used 19% more energy. The results were from using WattCat vice the car's trip computer.
 

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I can't provide the extra consumption of resistive heating in kWh but in my winter tests using the same 37 mile route, time, temperature and driving conditions using Auto climate control at 72掳 increased consumption by 32.6% as compared to driving with climate control off. Using 2 seat heaters and climate control off used 19% more energy.
That is lot
 

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WattCat showed 12.85 kWh used with no climate and 17.15 kWh with climate on. The car was still pretty efficient at 32掳 and climate off but dropped dramatically with the heater running.
 

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Super helpful, thank you! To be curious, blasting the radio didn't impact usage much at all? Kind of surprising. Might make sense though. I had an XE previously, and there is a significant difference between the 825w Meridien system in that car and the I-PACE. 2 less speakers, but a lot less "oomph" across the mid and low end ranges. Likely to conserve energy.
Just remember that 825w system is normally using less than 5 watts. 825 is the max peak output which it can probably do into an 8 ohm load for less than a second.
 

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I can't provide the extra consumption of resistive heating in kWh but in my winter tests using the same 37 mile route, time, temperature and driving conditions using Auto climate control at 72掳 increased consumption by 32.6% as compared to driving with climate control off. Using 2 seat heaters and climate control off used 19% more energy. The results were from using WattCat vice the car's trip computer.
Do you remember whether the car was heated before you started, or had to heat up on the way? Meaning, did you precondition the car, was it parked in a warm-ish garage, etc? I can see a big chunk of power being used to initially heat the car to a comfortable temperature and then less to maintain the temperature if the interior of the car was at freezing when you started, for instance. That would make consumption percentage a little awkward to compare, since the percentage would depend with the length of your trip if there was a big fixed cost at the start of whatever drive you did.
 

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Do you remember whether the car was heated before you started, or had to heat up on the way? Meaning, did you precondition the car, was it parked in a warm-ish garage, etc? I can see a big chunk of power being used to initially heat the car to a comfortable temperature and then less to maintain the temperature if the interior of the car was at freezing when you started, for instance. That would make consumption percentage a little awkward to compare, since the percentage would depend with the length of your trip if there was a big fixed cost at the start of whatever drive you did.
I didn't precondition as the car was in a warmish garage. Preconditioning uses about 3.5 kWh so I don't use it on shorter trips. My test was on a 37 mile drive where the energy used pretty much evens out over distance.
 

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ScienceGeek said:
Climate
Max A/C
bounced wildly between 5 kW and 12 kW. I did not test other A/C settings because cabin climate will vary a lot depending on conditions. The 12kW reading did not last long, I suspect that sustained Max A/C will draw 6kW or so before settling in to 3kW or so when the cabin has been cooled a bit.
Blower only
On 3, driver's seat only smart climate on, just under 0.1 kW. Smart climate off, 0.15 kW
On 7 (highest setting), driver's seat only smart climate on, 0.2 kW. Smart climate off, 0.3 kW
Cooled seats
Highest setting (3). Driver only <0.1 kW, both driver and passenger 0.15 kW. [This is amazing, and consistent with anecdotal observations by others!]
Rear defrost, 0.4 kW

Knowing what I have previously read in the owners manual about the heated part of the seats(The manual Heated seats consume a large amount of battery power). I question the cooled seat's load, as I would expect the initial seat cooling load to be the same as the normal A/C mode, as it uses the same system to get there that the normal HVAC uses, with the exception being the fan under the seat versus the fan of the regular HVAC system. It appears that you are only getting the underseat fan load and are not getting the heat pump(HVAC compressor) load in the seat cooling readings. I am not sure if you can run the seat coolers without having the normal HVAC running. Are you sure the heat pump hadn't already cooled down the system prior to testing the seat cooling system load? I would also doubt the heat pump has a variable speed on it, but it may have or a throttling valve on it(I could be wrong). It may also control the cooling temperature via the heating coils in the water system, like most gas cars do, thus leading to large cycling of amps when controlling the system at a steady temperature in the I-Pace. This prevents premature compressor failures from too many starts.
 

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Hmmm, that's interesting, I'll have to check that out. Would you suggest to run this test for longer, or at higher temperatures? Something is different I swear between regular AC with the fans blasting a ton of cold air vs the seat. Note that the OBD tool just shows the overall consumption, it doesn't care which consumers are on.
 

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Hmmm, that's interesting, I'll have to check that out. Would you suggest to run this test for longer, or at higher temperatures? Something is different I swear between regular AC with the fans blasting a ton of cold air vs the seat. Note that the OBD tool just shows the overall consumption, it doesn't care which consumers are on.
Could it simply be that the compressor needs to run far less with only seat cooling than cooling the entire interior of the car? It would make sense given how much less of a task that is to just cool the seats as opposed to the interior.
 
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