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Discussion Starter #1
Here in 'the Sunshine State,' sometimes that sunshine is liquid sunshine, and in mass quantities.

One of my criteria for any new car that led me to buy the I Pace was the benefit of AWD (and the adjustable height was a bonus) for the rainy times.

I figured AWD was on all the time and it would take care of any traction issues.

Then I read here that in comfort mode (my normal choice), the power is all to the rear tires (eco, a 30/70 front to rear power ratio). I know the adaptive all surface mode is specified for snow, off-road, and rain.

So should I be using that in those conditions, or is comfort (or eco) sufficient? I am not an aggressive driver pushing the envelope, although I do tend to speed in normal rain, if I'm on the highway.
 

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AWD only helps acceleration in the rain, it doesn't really serve any other benefit. It's one of the great American automaker myths, that AWD = safer car in rain & snow. Good tires and safe driving techniques is all that matters.
 

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Here in 'the Sunshine State,' sometimes that sunshine is liquid sunshine, and in mass quantities.

One of my criteria for any new car that led me to buy the I Pace was the benefit of AWD (and the adjustable height was a bonus) for the rainy times.

I figured AWD was on all the time and it would take care of any traction issues.

Then I read here that in comfort mode (my normal choice), the power is all to the rear tires (eco, a 30/70 front to rear power ratio). I know the adaptive all surface mode is specified for snow, off-road, and rain.

So should I be using that in those conditions, or is comfort (or eco) sufficient? I am not an aggressive driver pushing the envelope, although I do tend to speed in normal rain, if I'm on the highway.
Also being in the Sunshine state and having had the car for more than a year, I found comfort mode (pre H264) was fine. The main limiter has always been visibility when you get those massive deluges. There are some stretches of road with less than optimal drainage, in which case AdSR might be the best. I haven't hit those conditions since H264 was applied on Jan 2. I think going with the mfg recommendation might be best, but again... visibility seems to be the major limiter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
AWD only helps acceleration in the rain, it doesn't really serve any other benefit. It's one of the great American automaker myths, that AWD = safer car in rain & snow. Good tires and safe driving techniques is all that matters.

Then count me among the fooled, I guess. At least with almost new tire tread (<2,500 mi) on my 20" wheels, my safety concerns are met anyway. Thanks for your reply.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Also being in the Sunshine state and having had the car for more than a year, I found comfort mode (pre H264) was fine. The main limiter has always been visibility when you get those massive deluges. There are some stretches of road with less than optimal drainage, in which case AdSR might be the best. I haven't hit those conditions since H264 was applied on Jan 2. I think going with the mfg recommendation might be best, but again... visibility seems to be the major limiter.
I've found that working fine also, but so far driving only in more moderate rains, not yet driving in heavier downpours or through much in the way of accumulated puddling.

So AdSR is the only mode that does instant torque changing for traction reasons? I guess it is not so common a need, except for the snow or off-road driving conditions.
 

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Then count me among the fooled, I guess. At least with almost new tire tread (<2,500 mi) on my 20" wheels, my safety concerns are met anyway. Thanks for your reply.
To be clear, AWD does nothing to prevent or help against hydroplaning nor does it assist braking distance. Those are the two primary causes of wet weather accidents on highways.

AdSR / Wet Mode helps by lowering the immediate torque, turning up safety systems, etc.. One of the main concerns you should have in wet conditions with an iPace is torque steer, which can easily cause ideal conditions for hydroplaning. If an iPace starts hydroplaning it's up to fate. The solution is to use one of the modes with the throttle response lowered and to apply power slowly & consistently.

Many bad weather accidents are caused by people thinking AWD is a safety mechanism, it is not.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
To be clear, AWD does nothing to prevent or help against hydroplaning nor does it assist braking distance. Those are the two primary causes of wet weather accidents on highways.

AdSR / Wet Mode helps by lowering the immediate torque, turning up safety systems, etc.. One of the main concerns you should have in wet conditions with an iPace is torque steer, which can easily cause ideal conditions for hydroplaning. If an iPace starts hydroplaning it's up to fate. The solution is to use one of the modes with the throttle response lowered and to apply power slowly & consistently.

Many bad weather accidents are caused by people thinking AWD is a safety mechanism, it is not.
I would not have used my mistaken ideas about it to push the envelope in those conditions. But I did think there was an additional margin of safety added by it.

I try to learn one new thing every day, and thanks to you and all for helping me do that this day! (A fairly regular occurrence here on this forum, actually!)
 

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Last weekend I drove through very heavy rain on interstate highways. It was so heavy at one one point that adaptive cruise radar didn't detect a car pull over in front of me at too close of distance. Personal reflexes did. The car didn't even show up on the display.

At one point the drainage was too poor (ruts too deep) and it instantly cut off cruise control with the slightest hint of hydroplaning. I'm glad no one was too close behind because high regenerative braking engaged.

This was all in H264 comfort mode and without AdSR engaged. I should have engaged that, but I forgot I have it.

The abundance of liquid sunshine for at least 50 miles didn't seem to bother it.
 

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The I-Pace is aided by a very high wheel loading. The tires are relatively narrow for the vehicle weight. There is over 1200 lb per tire.
 

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Has anyone used and noticed benefit from AdSR or Low Traction starts?

We just got clobbered with a foot of snow here on Vancouver Island. Local drivers slide all over the place in this stuff. I was out in the I-Pace today, just in regular comfort mode, but used the suspension to raise the vehicle and it performed wonderfully. Never thought about the other options/settings like AdSR.
 

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I've been saved by AdSR and low friction launches several times here in frosty Norway. If the car is stuck in icy conditions a high level of torque is not the best way to going. Low friction launch makes it significantly easier to stay in control.

AdSR basically ups the sensitivity of the stability control systems which is great in conditions where you expect to frequently loose traction.

The above mentioned mechanisms along with AWD makes the I-Pace an amazing winter vehicle. However, winter tires are an absolute requirement for any sort of reliable traction in winter

AdSR and low friction launches makes the I-Pace a lot better in challenging conditions than my Tesla Model S was.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've been saved by AdSR and low friction launches several times here in frosty Norway. If the car is stuck in icy conditions a high level of torque is not the best way to going. Low friction launch makes it significantly easier to stay in control.

AdSR basically ups the sensitivity of the stability control systems which is great in conditions where you expect to frequently loose traction.

The above mentioned mechanisms along with AWD makes the I-Pace an amazing winter vehicle. However, winter tires are an absolute requirement for any sort of reliable traction in winter

AdSR and low friction launches makes the I-Pace a lot better in challenging conditions than my Tesla Model S was.
Thanks for that information about its advantages.

I guess the question is still if it benefits driving in heavy rains and/or through standing water. Clearly it cannot prevent hydroplaning.
 

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It can’t but I slightly disagree that AWD doesn’t help. There have been many times in Audis where I have stupidly hit standing water asymmetrically in a car (not larger than the car), and having a good AWD with adjustment has shifted torque to other wheels that were not hydroplaning and maintained stability. Obviously again not if all 4 wheels are hydroplaning, but compared to just FWD or RWD the car will be more stable. Add that to the more immediate ability of electric motors to adjust to these situations and it is a significant advantage.

If it was bad enough I’d drive in ADSR, although I’ve only used that on heavy gravel and snow so far.
 

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There isn't any eco mode on my Hse , where is that driving options?
Jaguar has an app called iGuide which is the electronic owners manual. I don't know if it's available in your country but it has short videos that show you how to operate the car's equipment.
 

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I use AdSR. Works the best in heavy rain
I didn't know what AdSR was until I looked it up. Seems my car has Rain, Ice, Snow mode instead of AdSR and it worked great all winter long. Highly recommend it but plan on snow tires next winter too.
 
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