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It’s interesting the upgraded Meridian sounds pretty ok to me and I am very picky (I am an audio professional). I only use Stereo mode (but that is my thing, all other processing sounds too processed and disjointed to my ears). There is more than enough low frequencies and the three controls allow to make most high quality source material sound pleasant. it is not the best system I’ve ever heard, but it is definitely in the ok to good range of quality even by my picky standards.

I wonder why some peoples systems sound tinny. Could there be some speakers not working?
 

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I have a 2019 I Pace with the 825w Meridian sound system Overall it sounds good, but is lacking in bass. I have adjusted the bass and treble to put most of the bass on the subwoofer and not on the small speakers. I think replacing the subwoofer would help. The problem is I can’t find the subwoofer. It appears to be on the drivers side in the cargo area, but there is no access to it. Has anyone replaced the subwoofer in an I Pace?
 

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MY21 Portofino Blue HSE, Pano Roof, Clearsight Mirror, Air Suspension & AD, Upgraded Cabin Light
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It may also be a function of what you listen to. I find the bass pretty acceptable, too much bass in a small enclosure (I am thinking here of the Bose in my previous GTRs) was overwhelming and you could physically see the air moving. I find the overall bass balance to be fairly good and pretty well adjustable. When using the surround though some tracks sound horrible, the processing introduces pumping and breathing that is just not present in the original source giving an odd rising and falling effect. Its not clear to me what triggers this but it is totally unnoticeable on some tracks and painful on others (albeit it seems a small minority of tracks).
 

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I think the bass is great, not overpowering. I listen to Rap and house music between level 50 & 55 all the time and I like it
 

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Meridian is a great company for audio. I find that the bass is a bit lacking, too, but then I like my music going 20hz - 20khz.
 

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Depends on what we call “bass.” Musical bass doesn’t really go down to 20 Hz, that is more for explosion and kicks. And we are not very good at hearing very low frequencies. In fact when people set up their “high bass” cars they don’t realize they are sitting on 110+ dB SPL of volume at low frequencies, because they can’t “hear it.” They feel it. But it doesn’t mean its not damaging your hearing….

Your happy Tuesday thought.
 

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The sound doesn't really come together until you turn up the volume to about 70% the problem is that this often then introduces distortion in the mid to high frequencies on some tracks, this isn't unique to the iPace although the processing distortion I referred to above is in my experience.
 

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Depends on what we call “bass.” Musical bass doesn’t really go down to 20 Hz, that is more for explosion and kicks. And we are not very good at hearing very low frequencies. In fact when people set up their “high bass” cars they don’t realize they are sitting on 110+ dB SPL of volume at low frequencies, because they can’t “hear it.” They feel it. But it doesn’t mean its not damaging your hearing….

Your happy Tuesday thought.
It may be a happy thought, but it's also not accurate.

First of all, 110+ dB is very hearable even at 20Hz. According to the equal-loudness contour, it's equivalent to 60phon at 20Hz and 80phon at 30Hz. One must be completely deaf to not hear it:

Secondly, music does go down to 20Hz. Maybe not often, but the pipe organ can go all the way down to 20Hz and also the piano, harp, contrabassoon go lower than 30Hz. Of course, there's much more going on after 30Hz, but still, most musical systems aren't able to reproduce the first octave (20-40Hz) at all.

Finally, it's usually not the very low frequencies that will cause hearing damage, but the mids, where the ear is most sensitive. You talked about 110+ dB SPL, this can cause damage in minutes if talking about average listening level at mid frequencies. On the contrary, listening at reference level (say 85dB) will produce low frequency peaks of more than 100dB, but these will cause no damage whatsoever.
 

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I believe in subs. My monitors' response is excellent to 60hz, good to 60, okay to 40hz, and off a cliff below that. Very low distortion 40hz-20khz at 85db. A sub absolutely fills in the music, transforming the sound for the better. As the volume goes up, it gets even better. I did some spectral analysis of popular music, and there's a good deal of signal below 50hz at audible levels, even if not individual notes. A lot of electronic and hiphop has notes that hit in the 30-40hz range.
 
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I believe in subs. My monitors' response is excellent to 60hz, good to 60, okay to 40hz, and off a cliff below that. Very low distortion 40hz-20khz at 85db. A sub absolutely fills in the music, transforming the sound for the better. As the volume goes up, it gets even better. I did some spectral analysis of popular music, and there's a good deal of signal below 50hz at audible levels, even if not individual notes. A lot of electronic and hiphop has notes that hit in the 30-40hz range.
You're absolutely right (for the most part).

You also have to take into account that when you play at 85dB average (reference level), peaks in music can be up to 20dB higher. If you also add some headroom, you see that your speaker should not only be able to play undistorted at 85dB, but at > 105dB. Otherwise the sound will be compressed and distorted and can also lead to speaker damage.

Distance should also be taken into account. A speaker that is able to reproduce up to 100dB undistorted at 1m, will only be able to reproduce up to 94dB at 2m, due to the doubling of distance. Double the distance again and your options are severely limited.

Based on the above, there are very few speakers that play properly below 60-70Hz at normal listening distances. So, subs are usually required not just for the first octave (20-40Hz), but also the second one (40-80Hz). Otherwise what you perceive as bass are harmonics and standing waves from the room.
 

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You're absolutely right (for the most part).

You also have to take into account that when you play at 85dB average (reference level), peaks in music can be up to 20dB higher. If you also add some headroom, you see that your speaker should not only be able to play undistorted at 85dB, but at > 105dB. Otherwise the sound will be compressed and distorted and can also lead to speaker damage.

Distance should also be taken into account. A speaker that is able to reproduce up to 100dB undistorted at 1m, will only be able to reproduce up to 94dB at 2m, due to the doubling of distance. Double the distance again and your options are severely limited.

Based on the above, there are very few speakers that play properly below 60-70Hz at normal listening distances. So, subs are usually required not just for the first octave (20-40Hz), but also the second one (40-80Hz). Otherwise what you perceive as bass are harmonics and standing waves from the room.
It takes a very, very good speaker to play with flat frequency response and low distortion at and above 96db. For my money, I chose flat and some distortion. I think I cross over around 60hz. I tried 100hz, but the bass seemed directional then. It might have just been my eyes tricking my brain, though.

When I replace my one sub with two subs to sit beneath the speakers, I should be able to go up to maybe 150 or 200hz for crossing over, which will take a massive load off of the speakers and lower the distortion.

Truth be told, I listen over 95db and the speakers still handle it. There's just some distortion. They play loud, flat, and a little dirty. If I get really loud, they seem to compress the signal. Shrug.
 

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It takes a very, very good speaker to play with flat frequency response and low distortion at and above 96db.
True. But very good speakers are nowadays neither scarce, nor particularly expensive. As long as we're talking about proper speakers and brands (e.g. Genelec, Neumann etc.), not "hiend" stuff.

For example, take the Neumann KH310 monitor, with an 8inch driver:

The frequency response is flat as can be and the Max SPL (at 1m with 3% THD) is > 103dB from 70Hz and above. Not bad at all.

I think I cross over around 60hz. I tried 100hz, but the bass seemed directional then.
That's why the usual choice is 80Hz. Take as much off the speakers as possible, but avoid the directionality issue.

When I replace my one sub with two subs to sit beneath the speakers
Kind of unrelated, but regarding subwoofer positioning, the ideal position for subs and speakers is almost never the same. That's another advantage of having subwoofers, even if you could have real monsters of speakers that could potentially play all the way down to 20Hz. Low frequencies need to be treated differently and positioning is critical.
 

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Kind of unrelated, but regarding subwoofer positioning, the ideal position for subs and speakers is almost never the same. That's another advantage of having subwoofers, even if you could have real monsters of speakers that could potentially play all the way down to 20Hz. Low frequencies need to be treated differently and positioning is critical.
The ideal placement of subs is under my speakers where they're out of the way. :)
 

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It may be a happy thought, but it's also not accurate.

First of all, 110+ dB is very hearable even at 20Hz. According to the equal-loudness contour, it's equivalent to 60phon at 20Hz and 80phon at 30Hz. One must be completely deaf to not hear it:

Secondly, music does go down to 20Hz. Maybe not often, but the pipe organ can go all the way down to 20Hz and also the piano, harp, contrabassoon go lower than 30Hz. Of course, there's much more going on after 30Hz, but still, most musical systems aren't able to reproduce the first octave (20-40Hz) at all.

Finally, it's usually not the very low frequencies that will cause hearing damage, but the mids, where the ear is most sensitive. You talked about 110+ dB SPL, this can cause damage in minutes if talking about average listening level at mid frequencies. On the contrary, listening at reference level (say 85dB) will produce low frequency peaks of more than 100dB, but these will cause no damage whatsoever.
You are technically correct but it missed the point. I should have said human hearing is NOT AS SENSITIVE at very low frequencies, so people set up silly subwoofers in their cars not knowing the pressure level. Also yes there ARE some rare exceptions of instruments that go down to 20 Hz but that also missed the point. Unless you are interested in low held pedal tone in a very particular piece of pipe organ music or happen to listen to 20th centery double bass piece detuned very low it is NOT IMPORTANT to go that low. I was trying to explain things in generic terms rather than Nth degree detail.

Finally you are incorrect in WHERE the human hearing is sensitive to vs damage. The damage level to hearing has nothing to do with our hearing curve and sensitivity, Rather it has to do intially with permanent damage to the hair cells that resonate for us to hear frequency and eventually with drum and structural damage. Some of this is simply the pressure level produced.

The main point I was making about how silly it is to try to get “perfect” listening environment in a car and how inefficient and difficult it is to create sustainable low frequencies in a structure such as a car and how much space and power it would require. Simply that its unwise. Its much better to focus on the overall balance, quality fo reproduction and not using multi point speaker systems with badly reassembled frequency ranges reaching the listener after badly processing to create “exciting audio” (I am looking at you Bose).
 

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Also yes there ARE some rare exceptions of instruments that go down to 20 Hz but that also missed the point. Unless you are interested in low held pedal tone in a very particular piece of pipe organ music or happen to listen to 20th centery double bass piece detuned very low it is NOT IMPORTANT to go that low. I was trying to explain things in generic terms rather than Nth degree detail.
I am going to gleefully ignore the overwhelmingly large amount of information that I agree with and know to be true. Then I shall stand proudly and declare, "SOMEONE ON THE INTERNET IS WRONG!"

I recently set the low-pass filter on my sub to 30hz with a 24db slope. Many songs had almost nothing to play after that. Many songs had quite a but at that frequency range. My sub laughs at puny 20hz sounds, and it rocks the casba with them. Much recommend.

Also, Dark Side of the Moon had quite a bit going on.
 
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