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I’m considering a HSE, but haven’t driven one yet. I’m most concerned about range. I currently have a Model X, but always wanted a Jaguar.
 

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There is a huge difference between what a car shows on the Range Estimator, and what it really gets on the road.
Mixed driving in fair weather, without mountains (over 2000'), 65 mph max, the i-Pace will hit about 250 miles.

As it gets colder, terrain gets worse, speeds go up, all bets are off. I just used 1/4 charge driving 40 miles climbing 4200' at 65mph @ 45°F.
 

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I’m considering a HSE, but haven’t driven one yet. I’m most concerned about range. I currently have a Model X, but always wanted a Jaguar.
you gotta drive it to believe it
the cone course convinced me
while i have never driven an MX i doubt you can throw it around as much as the iCat
 

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I’m considering a HSE, but haven’t driven one yet. I’m most concerned about range. I currently have a Model X, but always wanted a Jaguar.
If you live in a warm weather environment and you have a relatively robust CCS charging network in the areas you drive, the range is likely not a significant problem. If you live in the land of cold weather and the CCS charging network is not well built in the areas you need to drive, it could be an issue. In temps below freezing, with mixed driving, 170 miles would be what you could expect. If you are taking a road trip in temps below freezing, do not plan on much more than 150 miles at 65mph. As the temps head towards zero Fahrenheit, expect closer to 100 miles as your max.
 

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If you live in a warm weather environment and you have a relatively robust CCS charging network in the areas you drive, the range is likely not a significant problem. If you live in the land of cold weather and the CCS charging network is not well built in the areas you need to drive, it could be an issue. In temps below freezing, with mixed driving, 170 miles would be what you could expect. If you are taking a road trip in temps below freezing, do not plan on much more than 150 miles at 65mph. As the temps head towards zero Fahrenheit, expect closer to 100 miles as your max.
We're getting 211 miles consistently on flat roads in comfort mode at near freezing temps (30-40 F) with mixed driving (30-70 mph) and front and rear car heaters set at 71 F.
 

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I’m considering a HSE, but haven’t driven one yet. I’m most concerned about range. I currently have a Model X, but always wanted a Jaguar.

I'm in a very warm climate year round and getting approx advertised range for City driving (~ 220-240mi.) and approx 190 mi. for Highway driving. Mixed should be right around 200-210 mi. That's all driving in normal, Comfort mode and/or Dynamic mode; not Eco mode. I currently have 630 mi. on my I-Pace which I've had for just over 1 week. See my thread... https://www.i-paceforum.com/forum/193-2018-jaguar-i-pace-ev-400-general-discussion/2153-highway-range-battery-efficiency.html
 

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Data point: 45°F at departure, altitude 700', speed 65mph, 15 fwy. Climbed to 4300', dropped back to 950'. 145 miles. 39% remaining. Calculated at 238 miles range. NO HEATER, set to Eco mode. I did run stereo loud, ran ACC and autosteering. I wore a jacket since I didn't know what range to expect, and it's in the middle of the Mojave Desert. Charging at Baker added 43 kWh in 45 min. So easy shot into Las Vegas with 88% battery. Would I have made it to LV without charging at Baker? Highly likely by hypermiling the trip at 60 mph with room to spare in 4 hrs.

Note: But I bought the car without knowing if the Baker site would be open. I figured I could make it by charging up at Victorville after the climb.
 

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An example of cold weather, highway driving, normal mode, climate set to auto, temp set at 67F, seat and steering wheel heat on, ACC/LKA on, car charged to 100% (165 miles predicted) and preconditioned for a 0815 departure in a heated garage (65F). Actual departure time 0825:

Outside temp 23F on departure, altitude 899', average speed 63mph, elevation climb 300', distance 55 miles. 2.02mi/kWh (49.5kWh/100miles).

Stopped to grab a snack at 55 miles exactly. Ended up taking a 7 minute break before continuing. Outside temp 19F, drove 53.3 miles with an average speed of 56mph, negligible change in elevation. 2.29mi/kWh (43.7kWh/100miles).

Arrived with 39% battery indicated after 108.3 miles. Plugged into a 50kWh CCS for 60 minutes using 43.7kWh, leaving the car at 91% charged (160 miles predicted). Outside temp 18F.

Drove 106.9 miles with an average speed of 61mph, elevation dropped 300', 1.95mi/kWh (51.3kWh/100miles). Arriving with 26% battery left (41 miles predicted).

It was not a windy day (for around here), wind speeds ~10mph out of the W/NW. But the only thing I can attribute the increase in consumption on the return trip is the light breeze which I was driving into.
 

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When I tried the steering wheel heater I saw a HUGE drop. I think it really sucks power, in contrast to the seat heaters that seem more economical.
 

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When I tried the steering wheel heater I saw a HUGE drop. I think it really sucks power, in contrast to the seat heaters that seem more economical.
It must be a bug in algorithm because the wheel heater is a tiny element compared to the seat heaters. Even the seat probably doesn’t draw more than 1-2 KWHr and should be negligible. I’m guessing headlights draw much more.
 

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When I tried the steering wheel heater I saw a HUGE drop. I think it really sucks power, in contrast to the seat heaters that seem more economical.
It must be a bug in algorithm because the wheel heater is a tiny element compared to the seat heaters. Even the seat probably doesn’t draw more than 1-2 KWHr and should be negligible. I’m guessing headlights draw much more.
Yes, steering wheel heat really doesn’t make a huge impact. The seats draw more. From the Eco screen there is a range impact screen which allegedly shows how much range could be gained if you turn off the ‘extras’ seat heat/steering wheel heat /windshield heat/rear window heat/headlight heat & AC. The odd thing, if you turn off the AC it turns off the Smart climate, which is what JLR says we should use for optimal efficiency...I have driven and entire ‘use of the battery’ 100% down to 15% with the AC off and it didn’t seem to make any difference at all and my range impact screen still claimed the AC was the biggest energy waster, even when turned off...
 

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It must be a bug in algorithm because the wheel heater is a tiny element compared to the seat heaters. Even the seat probably doesn’t draw more than 1-2 KWHr and should be negligible. I’m guessing headlights draw much more.
I would guess the numbers for the I-Pace would be somewhat similar to what is seen in this article for a Model S (https://www.teslarati.com/energy-saving-tips-tesla-subzero-weather-using-seat-heaters/). Surprisingly the steering wheel does use more than a single heated seat in the Tesla!:

"Energy consumption has been broken down by feature. Total energy consumption can be added together based on the number of features that are enabled.

Assuming a consumption of 333Wh/mile, we can compute the approximate range loss at miles per hour (mph) as a result of having these heating features on.

Baseline (vehicle at rest but powered up): 247 Wh = .74 mph
Defroster (rear window & side mirror heaters): 285 Wh = .86 mph
Steering Wheel Heater: 95 Wh = .29 mph
Heated Wipers & Nozzles: 95Wh = .29 mph
1 Seat Heater: 57 Wh = .17 mph
2 Seat Heaters: 133 Wh = .40 mph
3 Seat Heaters: 171 Wh = .51 mph
4 Seat Heaters: 209 Wh = .63 mph
5 Seat Heaters: 247 Wh = .74 mph
HVAC at ‘HI’ or 82F (28C): 6.4 kWh = ~18-20 mph
HVAC at 74F (23C): 342 Wh = 1.03 mph"
 

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Sorry I don't get this.

Do you mean that, for example, Steering Wheel Heater pulls 95W?
So if it's on for an hour that it consumes 95Wh?

And I'm totally confused by the conversion to speed ...
 

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Sorry I don't get this.

Do you mean that, for example, Steering Wheel Heater pulls 95W?
So if it's on for an hour that it consumes 95Wh?

And I'm totally confused by the conversion to speed ...
It isn't my data, I simply posted the information from the article. However, it isn't converting it to speed. The author is converting it to the number of 'miles' an accessory will use in an hour of use. At least that is how I read it.

So, the way I understand the article, in a Model S the heated wheel uses 95Wh. But, since Tesla people seem to always talk in 'miles', i.e. 'the charger gave me 41 miles' versus actual energy, i.e. kWh; the author converted the watts/hour number to miles/hour. So instead of simply leaving it that the heated steering wheel uses 0.095kWh, he converted it to the heated steering wheel uses 0.29 miles per hour of use...I guess it is a speed if you consider the car is 'using up' 0.29 miles per hour of heated wheel use. But of course computing things this way is very silly, as the number of 'miles' able to be traveled by a kilowatt is clearly widely variable. It makes zero sense to discuss energy use using miles in such absolute terms.
 

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OMG that's why I ignore the Teslafanboyforums ... why make it simple when it can be complicated?

Without knowing what the units actually are we can at least infer some relative relationships .. for example, as you noted, the steering wheel indeed uses more power than a heated seat!

And what about that HVAC at Hi vs 74 degrees? That's a crazy factor! I think it's because if you insist on maximum power from the heater, not only does it cost a bunch of energy to do the actual heating, but also the battery is drawn at maximum rate, which cuts down on efficiency.
 

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OMG that's why I ignore the Teslafanboyforums ... why make it simple when it can be complicated?

Without knowing what the units actually are we can at least infer some relative relationships .. for example, as you noted, the steering wheel indeed uses more power than a heated seat!

And what about that HVAC at Hi vs 74 degrees? That's a crazy factor! I think it's because if you insist on maximum power from the heater, not only does it cost a bunch of energy to do the actual heating, but also the battery is drawn at maximum rate, which cuts down on efficiency.
This statement seems to be very optimistic: "Jaguar estimates that things such as HVAC and heated seats will only draw about 1 percent of the power away from the battery." It is found in this article (https://turnto10.com/news/auto-matters/5-things-to-know-about-the-2019-jaguar-i-pace) from last July. It was these glowingly optimistic reviews that led me to convince myself that this car would work out ok for me...

I suppose it is entirely possible the Model S numbers have no correlation to the I-Pace accessory consumption...If I was smart and ambitious enough to test it, like the Tesla guy from the first article, I suppose I could get an answer...but I am neither.
 

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It's pretty easy to determine how much power your aux uses in the winter. Do a trip in Eco Mode with your heaters set the way you like. Record the data from the Jaguar Remote app. Do the same trip in emergency Low Power Mode.

Tip: Buy some really cheap pillows. The ones that are big but weigh nothing. Put a bunch in your car. Notice the difference (old VW Bug trick).
A human body generates a good amount of heat, but that heat is divided by the airspace. The smaller the cabin is, the warmer it is. If you do use heaters, the power needed and time to temp is lower.
 

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I’m sorry I call total bs on wheel heater drawing 95 Watts, more than a seat. It’s nothing more than a small resistive heater. Here is a reference for you: an incandescent light bulb turns 70% of the energy into heat. Imagine holding onto a 100 watt light bulb that is continuesly on...yeah that wheel isn’t drawing 95 watts and the heater cycles on and off. I’d say maybe 20 watt if that.

For perspective if you are getting 40 KWHr/100 miles then one hour of steering wheel heat will draw 20 Watt Hr, and let’s say you are driving 50 Miles/hr, you are drawing 20KW every hour. Having the wheel heat will increase your consumption to 20.02, decreasing your total range by .05 miles per hour. So over 4 hours you will empty the battery, drive under 200 miles having lost .2 miles of range. I know it’s only 90 KWHr battery not 100 but you get the idea. You are using .1% of the drivetrain consumption.

Use seat and wheel heat when you can, the main heater is the one that can decrease your range by 10-25%.
 
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