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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm glad to find this forum, as I am not getting very helpful answers from the dealership about charging issues on my 2019 I-Pace with 18K, bought new about 2 years ago. This may have been covered, but I'm not finding it on search, so forgive if this has been addressed.

I charge on 240V at home and have mostly done shortish trips until a few months ago, when I started making a regular freeway drive of 130 miles, followed by a 440V charge and return. My car originally showed a range of about 240 miles in it's first year, reduced to 220 miles this past winter, then 210 this spring. On my freeway drive, I initially was starting with 208 miles range, arriving with about 70 miles remaining, which seemed about right. However, more recently, my car arrives with only 30 miles remaining. On my last trip, I used 38kWh/100m and got exactly 50Kwh charge before return. Average speed was about 60mph on eco setting. I drive about 70-73mph with ACC and low regenerative braking. Anticreep is on.

I was concerned and had the dealership evaluate the car. After having it a week, they said nothing was wrong, that I should be using high regen and no anticreep. They did not check the batteries, nor even fully charge the car. They said software is up to date. On return home, the car charged to 212 mile range.

So, I don't understand the sudden drop in range, nor do I understand why my mileage hasn't increased as the weather has warmed. It would be helpful to know what sort of range the average I-Pace user is getting. The advertised range is 234 miles, and the battery pack size is 90 amp/hours. It seems that I should have more than 160 total miles of actual range on a battery pack of this size. I am also curious as to how far down the lithium battery is depleted before being considered "zero" range. On a cruising sailboat, a 200 ah AGM battery would not be depleted more than 100 ah, but I think the Lithium can go down further.

I can live without anticreep if I need, but it's hard for me to see that as much of a range issue. I also don't see that high regeneration should make that big of a difference on a fairly steady and mostly flat (Olympia, WA to Portland, OR) drive - I admit that I dislike the abrupt slowdown, "bumper car feel" to the regen setting. Others observations welcome here.

I appreciate any help in understanding whether my car has a problem vs my own usage somehow. At the dealership, the service representative admits to knowing nothing about the I-Pace and they won't let me talk to the mechanic. I am making my freeway drive again this week (have to pick up an XK engine block for one of my vintage jag projects!) and I plan to use high regen and no anticreep there, low regen + anticreep back. Can post results if there is interest.
 

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I am no expert but my understanding is;:
EV efficiency and range is indirectly proportional to average speed, so for every 10 mph faster you cruise you will seea reduction in range
I believe that the range the car indicates at the start of a journey is adaptive to your driving style, so the more "low efficiency" journeys that you make, the lower range will be indicated.
It is unfortunate that where we really need range, for longer journeys, the more likely we will be driving on faster roads and the shorter the range will be.
 

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With high regen, do not rapidly lift your foot off the go pedal. Take it more gently and moderate the regen braking affect. Once you get used to doing this, you'll rarely use the brake pedal.
On a long highway drive, you probably won't get much regen unless you go up a hill and then there's a long steep decline. You get more benefit of high regen when driving around town.

Slow down a little, too. Yes it may be difficult maintain speeds at or below the limit. Just sit back and enjoy the car. All those other people rushing by you are the ones who can't stand their cars and are anxious to get out of them. ;)

The GOM (guess-o-meter) is just a guess. It adapts to your driving. Only 1 driver or multiple drives for this car? Adapting for multiple drivers could give it a completely wrong guess. Search for "GOM".

Have an Android device? Download WattCat. It's a better tool than the Jaguar Remote app. Charge the car to 100% at home and use WattCat to see what the battery full charge kWh is. Most cars should have a value > 82kWh. At this time of year, mine varies form 84kW to 87.2kWh in the display at the end of a full charge. This number actually comes from the data reported to the Jaguar servers from the car.

What brand of charger do you have at home?

You can also reset the GOM. This will restart the adapting of the guess. You can expect a high number at first and it will adapt to a lower number.
Press the start button once with foot off the brake pedal.
Press the brake pedal all the way down and hold it.
Press the go pedal all the way down and hold it.
After 10 seconds the GOM will reset.
I recommend doing this at a 100% state of charge.

It's a shame the dealer didn't provide a full 36 cell health report of the traction battery. That would indicate if any of them are wearing out sooner than expected.
 

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I was going to say the same thing, keep an eye on total battery SOC when 100%
The WattCat will give you a good indicator.
I hope yours is not like my 2019 year, where the battery slowly did not charge to >80%,
6 to 8 months later, my battery is dead.
Finally have an appointment in June. Stay tuned.
 

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My guess is it's just adjusting to your new driving style. Slow down and you'll get more range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My guess is it's just adjusting to your new driving style. Slow down and you'll get more range.
Thanks very much for the very helpful advice. I've downloaded the app and will see what some of the numbers are. I'll report back in a few days. It will be difficult to slow down a lot. At 70, 99% of the vehicles, including trucks will pass me.
Ron
 

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Thanks very much for the very helpful advice. I've downloaded the app and will see what some of the numbers are. I'll report back in a few days. It will be difficult to slow down a lot. At 70, 99% of the vehicles, including trucks will pass me.
Ron
If you're going over 70, you're definitely going to watch that meter drop faster, especially if you're not consistent or there are hills. If you want to get the full 240 miles of range, you'll need to drive slower. If 80mph? 160-200 miles seems reasonable, but again, terrain matters.

But like people say, look at the charge remaining more than miles, because miles is a bad guess, and percentage of battery is clear. You covered 100 miles and are at 50% battery? You know how far you can go at that same speed. Need to go farther? Slow down.

This isn't a Jaguar issue so much as it is an EV issue. My Model Y is rated for 326 miles, but at 75, I think it goes 220-230 miles. Maybe a little farther as a 2021.
 

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If you have the 22” wheels you will see a reduced range over the 20” or 18” as well. If you use the light load setting with reduced tire pressures this will also impact the range. My GOM never shows above around 350 kms (218 miles) and to be honest, I don’t think I have ever attained that range either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I did put the WattCat app on, and it's interesting. My car was fully charged (212miles) and sat for a few days. Yesterday, it then showed only 200 miles range 95% charge. I plugged it in to top it off and to see what the app would do, and it would not charge beyond 96%, showing "paused "at a range of 206 miles. Attempts to get it to resume charging only gave an error. That's a bit strange, but maybe related to the time unused after the earlier charge?

Where on the app would I find the total amp hour capacity? On the summary page, mine shows 47.2KWh. This doesn't seem right for the estimated mileage. I'm going to take the car out for a drive today, and see what happens when I charge it again.

I don't have the 22" wheels - mine are 20".

As to driving speed, I agree with the comment, and am often content to lazy along, but being out of sync with the flow of traffic can be a risk imo. 5 years ago, my 1 ton pickup was totaled and my wife and I were traumatized after T-boning the center median concrete barrier because we were hit from behind and spun while driving 60mph (the speed limit) in the right hand lane of I-5. One advantage to driving in the right hand lane is that nobody can pass you on the right, which is a big problem everywhere in the US, but people will definitely tailgait.
 

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Have you got a preferred charging period set on the car?

What brand of charger do you have? I've seen Juicebox stop charging when its app thought it had reached maximum capacity for the car (per the app).

In WattCat touch the menu bars upper left and select "Charging", or touch the "fuel pump" icon for the same thing. You'll see the charged capacity there.
 

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With high regen, do not rapidly lift your foot off the go pedal. Take it more gently and moderate the regen braking affect. Once you get used to doing this, you'll rarely use the brake pedal.
On a long highway drive, you probably won't get much regen unless you go up a hill and then there's a long steep decline. You get more benefit of high regen when driving around town.

Slow down a little, too. Yes it may be difficult maintain speeds at or below the limit. Just sit back and enjoy the car. All those other people rushing by you are the ones who can't stand their cars and are anxious to get out of them. ;)

The GOM (guess-o-meter) is just a guess. It adapts to your driving. Only 1 driver or multiple drives for this car? Adapting for multiple drivers could give it a completely wrong guess. Search for "GOM".

Have an Android device? Download WattCat. It's a better tool than the Jaguar Remote app. Charge the car to 100% at home and use WattCat to see what the battery full charge kWh is. Most cars should have a value > 82kWh. At this time of year, mine varies form 84kW to 87.2kWh in the display at the end of a full charge. This number actually comes from the data reported to the Jaguar servers from the car.

What brand of charger do you have at home?

You can also reset the GOM. This will restart the adapting of the guess. You can expect a high number at first and it will adapt to a lower number.
Press the start button once with foot off the brake pedal.
Press the brake pedal all the way down and hold it.
Press the go pedal all the way down and hold it.
After 10 seconds the GOM will reset.
I recommend doing this at a 100% state of charge.

It's a shame the dealer didn't provide a full 36 cell health report of the traction battery. That would indicate if any of them are wearing out sooner than expected.
This reply is a really thoughtful one..

I too noticed early on that every mile per hour over 62+/- dramatically lowered the range. Like this gentleman said, enjoy the car, slower( to a point is safer and less stressful).
I decided on longer trips that I would prefer to slow down than to remain in a charger longer.

I have noticed that dealers are not all the same. Maybe a different dealer would evaluate the battery BUT I would immediately reset the GOM , drive a bit slower and see what that does to your range.. I am betting it will please you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I charge pretty randomly, but try to charge during the day when my photovoltaic system is active. My excess power goes back in the grid unless I use it.

I have a Bosch unit that I installed when we bought a Volt in 2013. We now have a 2018 Volt.

I made a little trip to town, 9 miles. On one leg with low regen I used 38Kwh/100m, the other on high about 29Kwh/100m. Seems quite worthwhile around town. I'll do the bigger experiment on Friday.

I'm recharging now, and will reset the GOM when 100%. I'll look for the amp hours then.
Thanks to all who have responded.
 

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I'm recharging now, and will reset the GOM when 100%. I'll look for the amp hours then.
Thanks to all who have responded.
WattCat should show between 82-85 kW at 100% state of charge. I was seeing 81-82 during the winter and 84-85 now that it's warmer.

If you see anything below 80 you might consider asking the dealer to perform a battery health report. I had to pay for the test but it was reassuring to know that all the cells were within 1% of each other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well, at 100% charge, I'm showing 51.45kWh. That doesn't sound good to me. WattCat suggested I leave it plugged in to balance the cells.
 

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Well, at 100% charge, I'm showing 51.45kWh. That doesn't sound good to me. WattCat suggested I leave it plugged in to balance the cells.
I think another trip to the dealer is in order. If they give you a hard time about testing the battery, perhaps a call to Jaguar North America can help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I am also confused by the range of 209 miles. Seems that would be lower if the battery pack was down that much, but maybe that's why it's nicknamed guess-o-meter? The range did not change when I reset the GOM. How reliable is the WattCat data and will the dealer accept it as a reason to recheck the car? I think that's probably not answerable here, but I guess I'll be finding out. At this point, I'm afraid to take the car on a longer road trip, especially one that requires me to deliver my wife for a medical appointment on time.

As for Jaguar North America, I did speak to their customer service line last week, thinking that they may have an expert about the I-Pace that I could talk to. They do not have any access to technical personnel. None-the-less, I think it's a good idea if I get nowhere with the dealer.

At this point, I'm thinking that it might be best to rack up some local miles and watch the range/battery capacity, gather more data to present to the dealership.
 

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You most likely have a bad battery, or to be more precise, a bad battery module or two.
A bad battery will (1) give you poor range and (2) it will accept substantially fewer kWh from your charger when you charge back up. You can test this thus:
Fill up to 100% or to whatever the car will let you. Record the SoC from WattCat, both the %age and the kWh.

To ask about (1):
a. Drive a reasonable mix of trips until you're at less than 5% SoC.
b. Make sure that all "journeys" are recorded and visible in the Jaguar Remote app or on WattCat.
c. Calculate the number of kWh used for each trip. For example, if one trip used 32kWh/100miles and you went 25 miles you used 25 miles * 0.32 kWh / mile = 8 kWh.
d. Add the kWh of all trips to get an estimate of the total number of kWh used for the "full tank".
e. Add up all miles too and the difference in kWh SoC that WattCat reports.

Then, to ask about (2):
Regardless where you charge (fast charger or at home), record the number of kWh that the car takes to go from that low charge you ended up with to 100%. On L2 you expect 13% charging loss, on DCFC it's less than 5%, so you need to subtract that from the total to know how much went into the battery.

I did this repeatedly when I had a bad battery in my first I-Pace. The dealer should, on the basis of this information, run a proper battery health check and then they'll see it for themselves.
 

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While I don't have the answer yet, mine displayed 200 to 210 miles at 100% full charge even though the
WattCat was dropping below 50 kWh. Problem is a dealer may not recognize WattCat.
Note what is happening over time with my I-Pace:
This is the 100% charge state per WattCat.
So from this I predicted the time/date that my battery would be dead.
Now it is sitting in the garage until it can be towed to my appointment.
It was not until it died that I even got a fault message. (WTF)

5650

5649
 

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I agree, do a battery check and be sure to post how much it cost to do the check. My dealer wants big cash to do one and will not do it when he is hooked up for other things.

If you double your speed, you quadruple the force against the car. 30mph=15lbs of wind force pushing back on the car. 60mph=60lbs of force pushing back against the car.
 
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