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Hello, I would like to know if anyone has experience with the level 1 charger (car to home socket) supplied with the vehicle being able to charge at 230V X 16 A (total of around 3.6KW). Home sockets are usually 10A, but installing a socket supporting 16A is not a problem. The current voltage in my country is 230V, therefore if the level 1 charger can support 16A, charging at 3.6KW should not be an issue. Considering my daily commute of around 60km, if the above is possible then I wouldn't need level 2 charging at home (wallbox) at all, as I don't really need 7.2KW charging on a daily basis.

I am waiting for the car to be delivered in the coming two weeks and currently exploring the available charging options.

I would really appreciate any answers. Thank you
 

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Assuming UK is common with rest of Europe, Jaguar's UK website says the supplied charging cable is 2 kW. That still beats the 1.2 kW we get here in the US. If I could do 2 kW on Level 1 then I might have been able to get by without the Level 2 charger. Although if you've got a variable rate plan for electricity, then being able to charge faster does provide the ability to cram the charging in when your rates are lower.
 

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To my knowledge the included cable is not adjustable. The rated power on the label is all it will do. Must have an outlet to support the rated power.

Having said that I believe the included cable will do fine to provide 60 to 80 km per day. You will spend a lot of time charging. And maybe there is a L3 charger in town you can jump on if needed. You can take your time to decide what L2 is needed if you find yourself driving more. Even then you may not need 7kW... 4 to 6 would be fine if the install is easier.
 

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I've used the granny charger several times in the last few months, plugged on a regular home socket (Schuko) that is certified to 16A, though that rate shouldn't be sustainable as it's a regular home socket (something like this: Socket Arteor - German - 16 A - 2P+E shuttered - 2 modules - white).

It manages to go over 3Kw for a little while at the start (10-20 min), then comes down to 1.9-2.2Kw for the most part, and finishes near 1Kw. These are measures from WattCat, so they might not be precise, and i'm not sure if they take into account the natural losses that occur while charging.

So, if you're expecting to get 3.6Kw with the default charger i think you'll be disappointed. 2Kw sustained is possible, and if you plan to drive 60 to 80 km per day, a charge of 7-8 hours every other night, complemented with an extended charge on the weekend will probably work for you (assuming you have a lower rate at nights/weekends).
 

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The car's charger design size is what controls the amperage coming into the car. Charger supply breakers have an internal feedback ring in them that only allows the charger in the car to use the rated amount of amps or it will trip the breaker if the cars charger tells it to. As examples: the US 120VAC 1/2 phase charger supply breaker is normally plugged into a 20amp rated line(w/20 amp ckt brk) but only uses the chargers rated amps, which I believe is around 11 amps in the I-pace. A 240vac 1 phase charger supply breaker in the US, is usually on a 40 or 50 amp circuit but usually only charges around 29amps based on the Jag's car charger.
 
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