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Hmmm...
So the i-Pace ranked last out of all existing EVs?

This doesn't seem to correlate with the level of satisfaction people are touting in this forum.
Granted, forums are usually places frequented by more "hardcore" automobile fans (who might better appreciate the Jaguar's merits compared to the average driver), but still...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Remember that charging infrastructure played a role in the rankings. Nobody disputes the fact that is still Tesla’s #1 bargaining chip. Quality of assembly? Nope. Trouble-free operation? Nope. Quality of interior materials? Nope.
 

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Sure, I expected Tesla to rank first based on that.

But we're talking worse than the e-Golf and Nissan Leaf (among ALL other EVs which also rank higher)!
 

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EVs were ranked by owner satisfaction. It appears that charging infrastructure played a big role in the rankings. At any rate:

Thanks for this. I'm still driving an ICE car (Volvo XC60) but have been seriously considering the I-Pace, and to be candid am somewhat surprised to see that car's score was the lowest when compared with others in both the premium and mass-market category. Nonetheless, in the context of my needs and wants I would still prefer the I-Pace over the others.

I actually found an HSE in Winnipeg which ticked off most of the boxes that I am looking for and considered the possibility of driving it back to Toronto. It seemed quite viable when I planned the trip using A Better Route Planner, until I noticed that I could adjust the settings to take into account things like weather. Of course, it's not uncommon to see temperatures of -25C on the route across the top of the Great Lakes, and when I entered -10C in the settings it became evident that the trip was not viable (unless I didn't mind being stranded in some small town while waiting for warmer weather).

I'm now hoping to find a car closer to home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Undecided, I’m sure you’ll love the car. The rankings in the article should be taken with a grain of salt. Look at Consumer Reports, at one point they said the Model S was the best car they ever tested and now they don’t even recommend it.

Use these articles as one data point and nothing more.
 

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Jd power is a marketing company. You pay to play.
 
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Jd power is a marketing company. You pay to play.
Perhaps, but I recognize that my needs and wants are arguably not the same as the average EV purchaser, nor even the majority of them (particularly considering the price tag).

I wonder where the Taycan would have placed?
 

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The only other non tesla was the audi etron in the premium segment and Tesla owners seem to be a different breed - a lot don't seem to care when their car malfunctions...
I'd be curious to see the methodology, sample size . The Ipace would still be my 1st and probably only choice in a BEV.

A bit surprised range came up as such a big factor. If I had to do a lot of long trips I wouldn't buy a BEV at this point for that use.
 

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A bit surprised range came up as such a big factor. If I had to do a lot of long trips I wouldn't buy a BEV at this point for that use.
My thoughts, exactly. Until you can "fill the tank" in ten minutes or fewer, I don't care how many charging stations there are.

BEV geeks seem to care only about the technical aspects of BEVs (range, charging rate, efficiency, screen size, fart apps, etc.) and don't care about what makes a car attractive for those of us who love cars as cars, not appliances or transportation pods. So I ignore what they say or like and buy what appeals to me...like an I-Pace.
 

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The only other non tesla was the audi etron in the premium segment and Tesla owners seem to be a different breed - a lot don't seem to care when their car malfunctions...
I'd be curious to see the methodology, sample size . The Ipace would still be my 1st and probably only choice in a BEV.

A bit surprised range came up as such a big factor. If I had to do a lot of long trips I wouldn't buy a BEV at this point for that use.
As noted, the I-Pace can't make it from Winnipeg to Toronto (or Toronto to Winnipeg) in the winter. Because of the Supercharger network the Model Y can make the trip easily.

As it happens my wife is from Winnipeg and still has lots of family there, so I am often obliged to visit Winnipeg.

Upon sober (exaggeration) reflection I would much prefer the I-Pace over the Model Y :)
 

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As noted, the I-Pace can't make it from Winnipeg to Toronto (or Toronto to Winnipeg) in the winter. Because of the Supercharger network the Model Y can make the trip easily.

As it happens my wife is from Winnipeg and still has lots of family there, so I am often obliged to visit Winnipeg.

Upon sober (exaggeration) reflection I would much prefer the I-Pace over the Model Y :)
Unfortunate. PetroCanada now has a nationwide network of fast chargers that theoretically should be able to get you across the country. Canadian Tire also has a large number of Flo fast chargers. My concern would be non functional ones when you need one. Winter driving would be risky in Northern Ont though that also applies to ICE vehicles. The network seems to be changing rapidly. There was someone who took a Taycan from BC to Ont and back i believe without difficulty. Can't recall where I read that.
 

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There was someone who took a Taycan from BC to Ont and back i believe without difficulty.
Guess it depends on your definition of "difficulty." To me, waiting 30 to 45 minutes for an 80% charge is a "difficulty." But, to each, his or her own.
 

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There are two issues aren't there

One is actually confidence in finding chargers available when you need them and when fairly close to no charge (to maximise charging efficiency and reduce the number of stops), this is a function of the overall network spread and the number of chargers in each location to reduce the likelihood of further waiting.

The second is the time each charge takes to complete.

The first one is arguably more significant the second a personal judgement that will work for some and not for others. For those who would typically do 250 miles plus non stop then the stop is an issue, a fair number would however drop a stop in a trip like that, for coffee loo etc. then the time is less material.
 

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Unfortunate. PetroCanada now has a nationwide network of fast chargers that theoretically should be able to get you across the country. Canadian Tire also has a large number of Flo fast chargers. My concern would be non functional ones when you need one. Winter driving would be risky in Northern Ont though that also applies to ICE vehicles. The network seems to be changing rapidly. There was someone who took a Taycan from BC to Ont and back i believe without difficulty. Can't recall where I read that.
Well, when I first considered the drive the mapping software had me using the PetroCanada network for most of the charging, and the trip was viable.. assuming a temperature of 0 C. But when I changed the presumed temperature to -10 C (which I expect is realistic... it's -17 C in Dryden this morning) then the trip was a no-go. Another option in normal times is south of the Great Lakes via Chicago but that's not an option with the borders closed due to Covid.
 

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There are two issues aren't there

One is actually confidence in finding chargers available when you need them and when fairly close to no charge (to maximise charging efficiency and reduce the number of stops), this is a function of the overall network spread and the number of chargers in each location to reduce the likelihood of further waiting.

The second is the time each charge takes to complete.

The first one is arguably more significant the second a personal judgement that will work for some and not for others. For those who would typically do 250 miles plus non stop then the stop is an issue, a fair number would however drop a stop in a trip like that, for coffee loo etc. then the time is less material.
I recall that in my younger days (the 1950s and '60s) it was very common to find restaurants or coffee shops attached to filling stations (in Canada at least). These days we're more likely to find stand-alone stations, or stations that also function as convenience stores. Perhaps as BEVs become more popular we will see these stores add a table or two for patrons to have a coffee while they charge.

I expect that I won't see the total adoption of BEVs in my lifetime, and we'll be a two-car family (one ICE). My BEV use will likely be limited to the 220 KM commute between our city home and our rural home, and notwithstanding that when I first considered the I-Pace a Jaguar salesman told me that the car didn't have the range to make the trip in the winter, I think that he was trying to sell me an F-Pace (which comes with a larger dealer markup). In any case, if I found myself in a pinch with 40 KM more to go there's a comfy coffee place with a charger just off the route, and across the street from the coffee place there's a big-box hardware store with two chargers, so range anxiety would not factor into my decision. (I'm fond of killing time in big-box hardware stores).
 

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-17 in Dryden would challenge the range. Not sure i would trust any BEV in those conditions. We're a 2 car family. The family hauler is an LR4 and would like to replace eventually with a BEV but need a third row. Maybe a Rivian or PHEV like a BMW x7. Not a huge fan of the MX - that shape just reminds me of the Pontiac Aztec - no offense to MX owners.
 

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I recall that in my younger days (the 1950s and '60s) it was very common to find restaurants or coffee shops attached to filling stations (in Canada at least). These days we're more likely to find stand-alone stations, or stations that also function as convenience stores. Perhaps as BEVs become more popular we will see these stores add a table or two for patrons to have a coffee while they charge.

I expect that I won't see the total adoption of BEVs in my lifetime, and we'll be a two-car family (one ICE). My BEV use will likely be limited to the 220 KM commute between our city home and our rural home, and notwithstanding that when I first considered the I-Pace a Jaguar salesman told me that the car didn't have the range to make the trip in the winter, I think that he was trying to sell me an F-Pace (which comes with a larger dealer markup). In any case, if I found myself in a pinch with 40 KM more to go there's a comfy coffee place with a charger just off the route, and across the street from the coffee place there's a big-box hardware store with two chargers, so range anxiety would not factor into my decision. (I'm fond of killing time in big-box hardware stores).
Your situation although fairly unique and specific is why BEV adoption will not be universal even in coming decades (unless enforced by legislation). That said, and it has been said on this forum many times previously, buying a vehicle based on the most extreme anticipated usage is not the most efficient use of personal or societal resources. A two car family seems a sensible option, or alternatively renting something for the Winnipeg/Toronto run in the heart of winter would seem more sensible than ditching a great BEV option.
In the warmer weather a cross Canada run sounds very appealing. I'd love to try in some day when the borders reopen
 

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-17 in Dryden would challenge the range. Not sure i would trust any BEV in those conditions. We're a 2 car family. The family hauler is an LR4 and would like to replace eventually with a BEV but need a third row. Maybe a Rivian or PHEV like a BMW x7. Not a huge fan of the MX - that shape just reminds me of the Pontiac Aztec - no offense to MX owners.
Not to change the subject, but I took an MX for a test drive and it had the most uncomfortable seat I have ever been in. I couldn't wait to get out. I would never have imagined myself keeping a car for seven years however my "early" 2015 Volvo XC60 has extraordinary chairs... better than the new Volvos I've told... and given my fondness for cross-country trips I am a bit spoiled. I test drove an I-Pace with the upgraded "performance" seats and found them quite good, and have read that they are more comfy than the standard HSE seats. Indeed, my preference for the performance seats is one of the reasons it has been difficult for me to find a suitable I-Pace on any dealer's lot. Of course, given the range of our current crop of BEVs the notion of driving for four or five hours without stopping to stretch is a bit unrealistic. :cool:
 

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Your situation although fairly unique and specific is why BEV adoption will not be universal even in coming decades (unless enforced by legislation). That said, and it has been said on this forum many times previously, buying a vehicle based on the most extreme anticipated usage is not the most efficient use of personal or societal resources. A two car family seems a sensible option, or alternatively renting something for the Winnipeg/Toronto run in the heart of winter would seem more sensible than ditching a great BEV option.
In the warmer weather a cross Canada run sounds very appealing. I'd love to try in some day when the borders reopen
The trip across the top of the great lakes is nice in the summer, but in the winter we fly.

For a trip through the Rockies we flew to Calgary and rented a convertible. It was summer top-down weather and the view of the mountains was something you could never enjoy with most sedans... although the panoramic sunroof would help.

Back when "BEV" meant Tesla I asked the Tesla map for a route from Toronto to Calgary, a 3300 km trip. At that early stage of the Supercharger network the routing I was given was Toronto to Seattle, Seattle north to Vancouver, then back east to Calgary... a 2000 km (1200 mi) detour :)
 
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