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Discussion Starter #1
Getting right down to the vital stuff, here's what we can expect from the battery. These specs come right from Jaguar but are just estimates although very practical given the current state of EV's.

  • The range of the I-PACE is enabled through its high-tech, lithium-ion battery which has a capacity of 90 kWh.
  • I‑PACE Concept can achieve 80% charge in 90 minutes with a 50kW DC rapid charger.
  • With 516lb-ft of instant torque available, the I-PACE Concept has two electric motors that together produce 400 HP.
  • The I-PACE Concept can offer a range greater than 354km on a single charge.
 

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That's an estimated range of 220 miles which is less than the Bolt's 238 mile range. Guess 400 ponies comes with a cost in terms of distance it can travel as the battery will be drained slightly faster.
 

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Its just estimated so for all we know that could turn out being in the high 200's by time it comes to market especially since we have a while to go before it releases as a production model.

This being FCA's first EV we can't even guess on our own how much it might be. But even if its around what we currently know it won't do much damage to sales if any.
 

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An 18 mile difference is essentially meaningless when you compare them for what they offer you. The I-Pace will offer much more luxury, materials, toys, performance, etc. So when you look at it that way, that marginal difference is nothing to worry about.
 

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An 18 mile difference is essentially meaningless when you compare them for what they offer you. The I-Pace will offer much more luxury, materials, toys, performance, etc. So when you look at it that way, that marginal difference is nothing to worry about.
Basically.

The main thing here though I think is the fact for most of us this is more of an accessory than a necessary and for Bolt EV owners odds are they will be using those much more then we will be using these. Plus when you factor in this is from a luxury brand, the range it gets drops down the priority list, it can only get so bad.

Only real concern with power is how reliable and dependable the system is.
 

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I plan to use the i-Pace as my daily driver and round trip drive to work every day is 60km, not taking into account the battery I'll spend sitting in rush hour traffic. 200 mile will be more than enough for me in that case and most long weekend trips I take, I already rent a large van or SUV for.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I plan to use the i-Pace as my daily driver and round trip drive to work every day is 60km, not taking into account the battery I'll spend sitting in rush hour traffic. 200 mile will be more than enough for me in that case and most long weekend trips I take, I already rent a large van or SUV for.
Depending on how good the regen systems are you should also factor in the range you will gain from that. Stop and Go traffic is great for regen systems. Too bad there's no exact math for it, sort of unique to specific vehicles and again this is JLR's first attempt.
 

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Unique to specific vehicles as to how much they regenerate, and depending on so many factors and influences, we can't possibly calculate how much is capable unfortunately.
 

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EVSE - Home "Charging"

It would seem that it is 4 months until the Production I-Pace is revealed (though we can glean a lot from the eTrophy) and perhaps (fingers crossed) 12 months until deliveries begin - now just might be the time to start a conversation about - Home Charging.

Electric Vehicle Service Equipment (EVSE) or Level 2 "Chargers" is what you will need to Google to discover what you will need. What I have discovered is that the charger is actual part of the vehicle and the EVSE is what provides the AC power to the car. Curiously all EVSEs are not created equal, as some require and thus provide more power to the car than others; and some can communicate with the vehicle, and you, more effectively than others. I think most of us will be wanting to "fuel" our cars at home and we will need to install this equipment as a simple wall plug will soon prove to be unsatisfactory. Initial investigations have revealed units that can provide 6.6 kW/hr up to 15.4 kW/hr (Teslas have even higher) and needless to say as the charge rate becomes quicker, the cost of equipment and installation increases, as does the heat subjected to the batteries (not a good thing).

I imagine that I am not alone when it comes to being a neophyte with regards to what I have to do once I get my I-Pace home and we will all have some prep work to do (for us first time EV owners). Jaguar will have training sessions to be sure and I am hoping that they will have a EVSE with some solid capabilities (for the purists) though many non-automotive brands are well respected; with very positive reviews. If you are just getting started checkout EVObsession's website regarding "Electric Car Charging 101" (North American Bias) it seems like a good start.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It would seem that it is 4 months until the Production I-Pace is revealed (though we can glean a lot from the eTrophy) and perhaps (fingers crossed) 12 months until deliveries begin - now just might be the time to start a conversation about - Home Charging.

Electric Vehicle Service Equipment (EVSE) or Level 2 "Chargers" is what you will need to Google to discover what you will need. What I have discovered is that the charger is actual part of the vehicle and the EVSE is what provides the AC power to the car. Curiously all EVSEs are not created equal, as some require and thus provide more power to the car than others; and some can communicate with the vehicle, and you, more effectively than others. I think most of us will be wanting to "fuel" our cars at home and we will need to install this equipment as a simple wall plug will soon prove to be unsatisfactory. Initial investigations have revealed units that can provide 6.6 kW/hr up to 15.4 kW/hr (Teslas have even higher) and needless to say as the charge rate becomes quicker, the cost of equipment and installation increases, as does the heat subjected to the batteries (not a good thing).

I imagine that I am not alone when it comes to being a neophyte with regards to what I have to do once I get my I-Pace home and we will all have some prep work to do (for us first time EV owners). Jaguar will have training sessions to be sure and I am hoping that they will have a EVSE with some solid capabilities (for the purists) though many non-automotive brands are well respected; with very positive reviews. If you are just getting started checkout EVObsession's website regarding "Electric Car Charging 101" (North American Bias) it seems like a good start.
It will be great if they have mobile trainers that visit you at home. Car makers have been planning to get away from the traditional dealership experience and more into personalized service. So depending on what JLR does and how your dealer adapts to it, that might be something you get.
 

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Charging need at home is usually way overrated.

You usually park at home 12 hours or more, and most people do not need 90 (84 usable) kW every day, so even if you come home after a lengthy trip with an empty battery, it will be full after a couple of days.

As for consumption, it is fairly easy, it is for the most part depending on battery size, for speeds around 50-60 mph, a Tesla S has around the same consumption as a Leaf... Around 180 Wh/km, or 300 Wh/ mile. I think the Jag will be the same, as it is lighter than the Tesla, and better aerodynamically than the Leaf. As for regenerating, it does not really add to range, the less you use it, the better range you will have. In Formula E, it is a different story, since that is racing, with max speed and max brake, the more of the braking power you can put back into the battery the better range, whereas for max range, just keep a steady speed and coast to lose speed.

I assume the I-Pace real-life range will be around 465 km, or 300 miles, just by using the above numbers.
 

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The max 50kw charging is a bummer. They say it will be future proofed to accept faster charging speeds in the future—does anybody know what that means? There are 150kw and 320kw charging stations out there now—so what are they waiting for?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So biggest takeaway here is to keep tabs on infrastructure developments because what our cars can do is predicated on that. Sadly this will mean some people will sit on the sidelines till the time is right, but its always a right time to get in for early adopters.
 

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Charging need at home is usually way overrated.

You usually park at home 12 hours or more, and most people do not need 90 (84 usable) kW every day, so even if you come home after a lengthy trip with an empty battery, it will be full after a couple of days.
Late replying, but in case of interest to anyone:

Whilst correct in many scenarios, I wouldn't be comfortable with it.

We have off-peak electricity for 7 hours during the night, so I would like to be charged within that time.

Yup, we do not return home with 0% exactly, and need 100% the following morning :) I have got home at 1% on one occasion. Once was enough for that ...

... but I do return home "as empty as possible". If my journey is long enough that I exceed range, and need to Supercharge (in my case) then I only charge enough to get home (plus, say, 20 miles "spare"). Otherwise I'm just sitting waiting at the charger ...

So I am arriving home at 10%, or so, and I may very well need a decent charge for tomorrow's trip - e.g. Saturday and Sunday outings. Being "back up to full battery in a couple of days" is no good on the days when you do need that range.

I would just prefer to be able to "easily" charge overnight. My charge rate gets me about 10% per hour, so if I come home on 10% I will need to charge for an extra hour, in addition to the 7-hour off-peak period, to get back to 90%
 

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Late replying, but in case of interest to anyone:

Whilst correct in many scenarios, I wouldn't be comfortable with it.

We have off-peak electricity for 7 hours during the night, so I would like to be charged within that time.

Yup, we do not return home with 0% exactly, and need 100% the following morning :) I have got home at 1% on one occasion. Once was enough for that ...

... but I do return home "as empty as possible". If my journey is long enough that I exceed range, and need to Supercharge (in my case) then I only charge enough to get home (plus, say, 20 miles "spare"). Otherwise I'm just sitting waiting at the charger ...

So I am arriving home at 10%, or so, and I may very well need a decent charge for tomorrow's trip - e.g. Saturday and Sunday outings. Being "back up to full battery in a couple of days" is no good on the days when you do need that range.

I would just prefer to be able to "easily" charge overnight. My charge rate gets me about 10% per hour, so if I come home on 10% I will need to charge for an extra hour, in addition to the 7-hour off-peak period, to get back to 90%
According to JLR, the battery true capacity is 84.7 kWh, and assuming it's a 90kWh array, 100% is not 100%, it has a buffer. As some Tesla owners can attest, their battery has either a tiny or no buffer at all.

240v x 32a for 7 hours should net 188 miles of range if a dollar or two is more than your budget can support. Normal people who can afford $60k+ cars, do not worry about paying $1 to $5 dollars extra for plugging in early for a special trip. The i-Pace has Departure Charging according to JLR. So you plug it in when you get home, and it starts charging based on your END OF SUPER-OFFPEAK time schedule.

Did Tesla ever get that corrected yet? It appears on cars that are as cheap as $25k loaded (ACC, Color of Choice, Nice wheels, Leather, Wifi Hotspot) after all taxes and incentives, so I assume a $50k stripped black Tesla (No ACC, plastic seating & backordered for 12-36 months) can do it by now.

And in areas where most EVs are sold, there are a large number of DCFCs although normally only 50kW. So you can top off close to home before your long trip begins. The first 150kW chargers are going in. There is one near me.

The i-Pace is programmed at this point at 100kW max. But an engineer stated they can change that up to 120kW through software should 120kW charging become available.

Yes, the Tesla has the better charging network. But neither match my Cadillac in luxury or range or quite frankly price either when optioned out. All EVs currently are inferior for interstate, anywhere, anytime travel. Should that be a critical need, there is not an EV available that matches existing ICE vehicles. Unless you count EREV class cars, that is full rated power on battery alone, as EVs. They operate as BEVs for commuting, but can even to Alaska, Canada, Mexico, anywhere there are roads.
 

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I agree, teslaowner. Life is too short to waste it on range anxiety or worrying about having your car plugged in every available minute.
 

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I agree, teslaowner. Life is too short to waste it on range anxiety or worrying about having your car plugged in every available minute.
That's why my kids and my shop use Chevrolet Volts. Normally you drive on pure EV at 100% rated power (>90% EV mileage fleet), but if you need a long trip, you just keep driving. Car didn't charge last night? No problem.
And for long trips we have a high end luxury car with all the amenities, 5 pattern massage, reclining AC/Heat rear seats, individual HDTVs, 34 speaker surround sound, privacy curtains, long range thermal imaging, AWD/AWS, adjustable dampening, privacy curtains, HUD, OnStar, Hot Spot, etc.
It's the LA-LV rocket in full comfort in 3 hr.

But the i-Pace is Dad's Chariot. There is no place I go, even LA-LV, that it won't. Long trips for me are by jet.
 

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As some Tesla owners can attest, their battery has either a tiny or no buffer at all.
Yes, agreed. Presumably "whole battery" available in Tesla, hence need to choose to charge to, say, 90% daily and then adjust to 100% "for trips" ... and risk that Punters don't understand and charge to 100% all the time, or charge to 100% and "leave it there".

Probably made more sense when batteries were a lot smaller, better to have an "unseen" buffer instead.

240v x 32a for 7 hours should net 188 miles of range
My mistake, I thought i-Pace could not charge at 240v x 32a

if a dollar or two is more than your budget can support
That's not the whole story though ...

Electricity in UK is 50% discount at off-peak so a) not exactly nothing :) and b) as an eco-warrior I would prefer to accomodate the power companies who are offering me that price to try to use their off-peak background load, rather than charging at peak times and contributing to their scheduling problems.

Can't speak of Jag, but on Tesla I can set a Schedule Charge Time at (each) location, so my car will start charging at midnight if I park it at home so, if I need more juice than that, I have to remember to override the scheduled timer (or not use it at all of course ...) and chances are I will forget.

Normal people who can afford $60k+ cars, do not worry about paying $1 to $5 dollars extra for plugging in early for a special trip
We have high tax on Fuel (like most of world outside USA) so the price saving using Electric is dramatic. Comparing price of Petrol/Diesel here to electricity means that on UK off-peak electricity I get around 200 miles-per-gallon equivalent. So you are right, it makes very little difference to me (compared to the Fossil Fuel price I was used to), if I charge a bit more/less at Peak/Off-peak. Of course Tesla owners will tell you that the main reason they bought the car was for "Free Supercharging", and £100K for the car to get $600 a year for Gas is crazy-talk. But we all love a bargain :) But my purcashe was as much for Eco Early Adopter as it was for performance or anything else.

The i-Pace has Departure Charging according to JLR. So you plug it in when you get home, and it starts charging based on your END OF SUPER-OFFPEAK time schedule.
Neat; hadn't heard that. Most of the 3rd party APPs I use don't provide a "charge ready for departure time" in case there is a power cut and they will be sued or whatever as a consequence. Nuts. I'd be happy to take that risk, it would be a very rare thing to get caught out

Did Tesla ever get that corrected yet?
Presume you are referring to Departure Charging? Definitely not got that. Scheduled Charging starts at appointed time (start of my off-peak period in my case). It is smart enough to decide that if I come home a few hours after that time that it should still start charging anyway, rather than "do nothing until tomorrow night :frown2:) so that part is OK.

so I assume ... can do it by now.
No telling what might arrive over the airwaves at the next update of course, but there are plenty of "Why haven't they build my [INSERT KILLED FEATURE HERE] yet", which is purely a consequence of the whole OTA ability creating an expectation in the consumer :)

Personally I'm not exactly sold on OTA. All the freebie cool stuff I've received in 2 years is a nice bonus of course ...

... but lets say the car updates tonight. Tomorrow my wife jumps in the car and reads the Update Notes (such as it is) on the Screen. She sets off ...

... later I jump in the car. No update notes for me, in fact no notification that it has changed. (In practice I would have go a notification on my phone, but that may not be the case for all the car's drivers of course). SO the first I know of a change of behaviour is when it occurs as I'm driving along ...

If I had to take the car to the shop to get here update then maybe ... MAYBE?? :nerd: ... the Support Person would tell me about anything important that I should know about. and MAYBE? I'd tell my wife ...

Taht said, some decent YouTube "training videos" from Tesla at each OTA release would do the trick ...

My Phone changing willy-nilly is at worst annoying. A car doing that ... I'm not so sure ...

But its a 1st World Problem for sure.

And in areas where most EVs are sold, there are a large number of DCFCs although normally only 50kW.
We have loads nearby too. (I looked on Plugshare recently and was really surprised), But 90% of them are one-pump sites so cannot be sure if will be free when you get there. And all have absolutely rubbish maintenance as I mentioned earlier. That's probably because government handed out money for people to install these things, originally, so no incentive to actually make them work :( Hopefully the whole "Have a nice day" service attitude in USA means that you have better service FULL STOP :)

The i-Pace is programmed at this point at 100kW max. But an engineer stated they can change that up to 120kW through software should 120kW charging become available.
I don't think this stuff is as big a deal as many folk seem to think. Including the 800volt 400KW or whatever Porsche stuff.

Yes it definitely needs to be faster than 32 AMP :) and indeed 100 kW is probably the minimum.

If you are driving coast to coast and have multiple charges to do speed will be nice. But if you just need "enough to get home" I really really doubt that the difference is important. I do that sort of charging quite often (i.e. when my out-and-back day trip exceeds my max 220 mile range by a bit) It would be very rare for e to need more than 80 miles extra and that would take 15 minutes; by the time I've walked to the services and had a pee, and maybe got a coffee or a chocolate bar, and walked back I've used up most/all the 15 minutes. If it was 7 minutes I would still go have a pee and get a coffee .. and often I don't need as much as 80 miles extra.

If the charge happened in 1 minute then, yeah, I'd skip the pee and coffee :) but I'd have still used up 5 minutes just getting off the highway and parking up, and then getting back onto the highway ... and if there isn't a suitable rapid charger right-on-my-route I have the extra detour-time to divert to its location (until they are on every street corner, like Fossil Pumps :) ) so all in all dramatically faster isn't really a great practical help IMHO

All EVs currently are inferior for interstate, anywhere, anytime travel
Agreed. We still have an ICE on the driveway ... although it is a small hatchback and more often used for pubic car parks (bays here are small and Tesla is huge) rather than long distance - I take the Tesla for long distance out of principle - I like to think I'm doing my bit for the planet.
 
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