Jaguar I-Pace EV400 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to have my tires replace. Not many shop other than the dealer can do 22 inch tires but I find this shop it can (it claims it is the only local shop that can do "fast spin" balance) but they are not sure if I-Pace needs special tools for alignment. Can anyone answer the question? Should I have the alignment done by the dealer regardless? Thanks

By the way, not much choices for 255/40R22, Pirelli P ZERO Performance Radial Tire- 255/40R22 103V or Continental Premium Contact 6 255/40R22 103V XL (J) Performance Tire. Which one would be your choice? Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
Call your local America's Tires or Discount Tires. They shouldn't have an issue. The dealer will overcharge. As for alignments, I cannot imagine a reason why a quality local place couldn't get the job done.
 

·
Premium Member
19 I-pace HSE Polaris/Fuji white with most options and a lot of accessories
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
Alignment is highly recommended if the old tires are showing uneven wear such as outer or inner edges wearing, or feathering of the tread.

Special tools are not required.

Camber and caster are not adjustable. Only the toe can be adjusted as well as axle alignment with the vehicle to ensure it isn't crabbing down the road.

However, there are some steps to take note:

1) parking brake must be released
2) it does say the brake booster module should be put into service mode. This requires interface from Pathfinder or a scan tool that can provide that function.
3) air suspension should be put into tight tolerance mode

Once they get under the car and remove the rear undershield they need to loosen but not remove 4 nuts to shift the rear axle assembly as need for its alignment. Retighten to 110 Nm.
Automotive design Motor vehicle Rim Font Automotive exterior


The rear toe locking nuts are supposed to be replaced if they are loosened for adjustment. Tighten to 60 Nm then 90 degrees more.

The front has typical tie rod locking nuts. Loosen, adjust then tighten to 115Nm.

Tightening the wheel lug nuts is a 3 step sequence, if done per spec. Tighten all to 4 Nm/3 lb-ft (typical alternating pattern), then to 70 Nm/52 lb-ft, then to 133 Nm/98 lb-ft.

When finished the suspension should be reset out of tight tolerance mode and the parking brake made operable.

Tire balancing tolerances:

The maximum Radial Force Variation (RFV) values should be as follows:
70N (7.1kg, 15.7lbf) First Harmonic.
110N (11.2kg, 24.7lbf) Peak to Peak.

Air suspension tight tolerance mode:
1) make sure transmission is in P position
2) Press the brake pedal firmly, press the start/stop button once and "ready" should be in the cluster
3) Open the drivers door
4) Press and release the brake pedal 3 times
5) close the drivers door within 10 seconds of the first brake pedal push

Deactivate this mode by pressing the start/stop button.

Active front air suspension specifications with the vehicle at 'Base Kerb Mass' ride height - full fluids, no
occupants/luggage, tires inflated to normal pressures.

Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Number
Rectangle Font Tints and shades Wood Ceiling


Passive front air suspension:
Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Number


Active rear air suspension
Rectangle Font Material property Parallel Screenshot

Font Rectangle Material property Parallel Pattern


Passive rear air suspension
Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Screenshot

Rectangle Font Material property Pattern Number


Axle alignment sets the wheelbase to 2990 mm/117.716 inches on each side.

Coil suspensions have different specifications. We hope the alignment equipment of non-dealers has the proper specifications programmed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alignment is highly recommended if the old tires are showing uneven wear such as outer or inner edges wearing, or feathering of the tread.

Special tools are not required.

Camber and caster are not adjustable. Only the toe can be adjusted as well as axle alignment with the vehicle to ensure it isn't crabbing down the road.

However, there are some steps to take note:

1) parking brake must be released
2) it does say the brake booster module should be put into service mode. This requires interface from Pathfinder or a scan tool that can provide that function.
3) air suspension should be put into tight tolerance mode

Once they get under the car and remove the rear undershield they need to loosen but not remove 4 nuts to shift the rear axle assembly as need for its alignment. Retighten to 110 Nm.
View attachment 7028

The rear toe locking nuts are supposed to be replaced if they are loosened for adjustment. Tighten to 60 Nm then 90 degrees more.

The front has typical tie rod locking nuts. Loosen, adjust then tighten to 115Nm.

Tightening the wheel lug nuts is a 3 step sequence, if done per spec. Tighten all to 4 Nm/3 lb-ft (typical alternating pattern), then to 70 Nm/52 lb-ft, then to 133 Nm/98 lb-ft.

When finished the suspension should be reset out of tight tolerance mode and the parking brake made operable.

Tire balancing tolerances:

The maximum Radial Force Variation (RFV) values should be as follows:
70N (7.1kg, 15.7lbf) First Harmonic.
110N (11.2kg, 24.7lbf) Peak to Peak.

Air suspension tight tolerance mode:
1) make sure transmission is in P position
2) Press the brake pedal firmly, press the start/stop button once and "ready" should be in the cluster
3) Open the drivers door
4) Press and release the brake pedal 3 times
5) close the drivers door within 10 seconds of the first brake pedal push

Deactivate this mode by pressing the start/stop button.

Active front air suspension specifications with the vehicle at 'Base Kerb Mass' ride height - full fluids, no
occupants/luggage, tires inflated to normal pressures.

View attachment 7029 View attachment 7030

Passive front air suspension:
View attachment 7031

Active rear air suspension
View attachment 7032
View attachment 7033

Passive rear air suspension
View attachment 7034
View attachment 7035

Axle alignment sets the wheelbase to 2990 mm/117.716 inches on each side.

Coil suspensions have different specifications. We hope the alignment equipment of non-dealers has the proper specifications programmed.
Thanks!

Seems complicated and many things could go wrong if not done carefully/correctly. In general, they recommend to do an alignment when changing tires. Now I am not sure if an alignment will be a good idea as my old tires do not seem showing obvious uneven wear but rear tires do wear more then front tires (see attached pictures.) The rear right tire was separated a few weeks ago. The dealer had only one tire to put on and I have to wait for other 3.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Strange, I wore my front tires out long before my rears tires were worn. My front tires did not show any alignment problems either. I was probably running the air pressure in the front to low which caused the front tires to wear so quickly on both sides of the tires, in addition to the 3 daily roundabouts I take at speed. I move the rear tires to the front when the front tires are worn out and put two new tires in the rear.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,186 Posts
Hey Tri, the only explanation I have for your front tires wearing faster is that you corner like a **** and hit the brakes real hard on a regular basis :p
The rear wearing faster than the front probably happens in Comfort driving. I only drive in Dynamic and have no difference in front vs rear wear. Because torque split.
 

·
Registered
2019 S with S21B and 16.2
Joined
·
196 Posts
I’m replacing my tires this week. I usually flip tires on the wheels since I wear the outsides the fastest. The 20” Goodyears are asymmetric so I can’t use that trick. The outsides of all 4 tires (thanks to front to back rotating) are chewed up from efficient driving due to maintaining maximum speed in the corners.
 

·
Registered
2020 I-Pace S
Joined
·
74 Posts
I’m replacing my tires this week. I usually flip tires on the wheels since I wear the outsides the fastest. The 20” Goodyears are asymmetric so I can’t use that trick. The outsides of all 4 tires (thanks to front to back rotating) are chewed up from efficient driving due to maintaining maximum speed in the corners.
How many miles did you get out of the Goodyears?
 

·
Registered
2019 S with S21B and 16.2
Joined
·
196 Posts
I am changing them before 28,000 miles. They have between 4.5-5/32” right now with even wear except for the outside edge. I just picked up a second nail in one tire close to the sidewall so I am changing all 4. I probably could have made it to 35,000 miles at 2/32” but I usually change tires as 4/32” tread depth for an extra safety margin in the rain. I figure I am losing out on ~25% of the possible mileage if I wore them down to the bars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Alignment is highly recommended if the old tires are showing uneven wear such as outer or inner edges wearing, or feathering of the tread.

Special tools are not required.

Camber and caster are not adjustable. Only the toe can be adjusted as well as axle alignment with the vehicle to ensure it isn't crabbing down the road.

However, there are some steps to take note:

1) parking brake must be released
2) it does say the brake booster module should be put into service mode. This requires interface from Pathfinder or a scan tool that can provide that function.
3) air suspension should be put into tight tolerance mode

Once they get under the car and remove the rear undershield they need to loosen but not remove 4 nuts to shift the rear axle assembly as need for its alignment. Retighten to 110 Nm.
View attachment 7028

The rear toe locking nuts are supposed to be replaced if they are loosened for adjustment. Tighten to 60 Nm then 90 degrees more.

The front has typical tie rod locking nuts. Loosen, adjust then tighten to 115Nm.

Tightening the wheel lug nuts is a 3 step sequence, if done per spec. Tighten all to 4 Nm/3 lb-ft (typical alternating pattern), then to 70 Nm/52 lb-ft, then to 133 Nm/98 lb-ft.

When finished the suspension should be reset out of tight tolerance mode and the parking brake made operable.

Tire balancing tolerances:

The maximum Radial Force Variation (RFV) values should be as follows:
70N (7.1kg, 15.7lbf) First Harmonic.
110N (11.2kg, 24.7lbf) Peak to Peak.

Air suspension tight tolerance mode:
1) make sure transmission is in P position
2) Press the brake pedal firmly, press the start/stop button once and "ready" should be in the cluster
3) Open the drivers door
4) Press and release the brake pedal 3 times
5) close the drivers door within 10 seconds of the first brake pedal push

Deactivate this mode by pressing the start/stop button.

Active front air suspension specifications with the vehicle at 'Base Kerb Mass' ride height - full fluids, no
occupants/luggage, tires inflated to normal pressures.

View attachment 7029 View attachment 7030

Passive front air suspension:
View attachment 7031

Active rear air suspension
View attachment 7032
View attachment 7033

Passive rear air suspension
View attachment 7034
View attachment 7035

Axle alignment sets the wheelbase to 2990 mm/117.716 inches on each side.

Coil suspensions have different specifications. We hope the alignment equipment of non-dealers has the proper specifications programmed.
I mentioned some of your alignment points to the dealer and they does not seem to know what I was talking about. Their answer is alignment is alignment, no special attention is needed for I-Pace. That made me nervous. What is your advice? Do it or not do it. Any reputable shop? Any dealer? Find a reputable dealer that knows about I-pace? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I mentioned some of your alignment points to the dealer and they does not seem to know what I was talking about. Their answer is alignment is alignment, no special attention is needed for I-Pace. That made me nervous. What is your advice? Do it or not do it. Any reputable shop? Any dealer? Find a reputable dealer that knows about I-pace? Thanks.
If you were NOT talking to the technician then they are 100% correct. MOST alignment issues are sorted with the usual simple alignment changes that re common to all cars. it is ONLY if your have unusual wear that you would go through the full process outlined above...95% of you should NEVER have to do that.
 

·
Premium Member
19 I-pace HSE Polaris/Fuji white with most options and a lot of accessories
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
I mentioned some of your alignment points to the dealer and they does not seem to know what I was talking about. Their answer is alignment is alignment, no special attention is needed for I-Pace. That made me nervous. What is your advice? Do it or not do it. Any reputable shop? Any dealer? Find a reputable dealer that knows about I-pace? Thanks.
A former CEO of American Motors once said during a radio interview covering a lot of car related topics that a car should never go out of alignment.

However, there are obvious times when an alignment should be performed. Such times are after a car accident, major disassembly/reassembly for a repair that involves front or rear suspension (think about the front wiring harness replacement), or an incident like running hard into a curb that causes physical damage. The latter happened to me on an icy road once. An offset washer for control arm adjustment had flattened one side of the piece it fit into.

Suspension and subframe bushings need to be inspected for wear that would cause the car to get out of alignment. Deteriorated bushings need to be replaced. Depending on what and how it gets replaced, an alignment may or may not need to be performed. I've replaced control arms on a multi-link suspension without the need for an alignment but that was not an I-pace. It probably got the car back into alignment too.

You could have an independent shop or dealer just do a check of the alignment as it is, with new tires on, and compare to specifications. Make a decision about getting an alignment with adjustments based on the comparison. I would expect a charge for this as it will take shop time but maybe they'll give you a reduced rate if they don't do any adjustments, or apply the charge to a full alignment. You would have peace of mind instead of wondering "Should I or shouldn't I get an alignment?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A former CEO of American Motors once said during a radio interview covering a lot of car related topics that a car should never go out of alignment.

However, there are obvious times when an alignment should be performed. Such times are after a car accident, major disassembly/reassembly for a repair that involves front or rear suspension (think about the front wiring harness replacement), or an incident like running hard into a curb that causes physical damage. The latter happened to me on an icy road once. An offset washer for control arm adjustment had flattened one side of the piece it fit into.

Suspension and subframe bushings need to be inspected for wear that would cause the car to get out of alignment. Deteriorated bushings need to be replaced. Depending on what and how it gets replaced, an alignment may or may not need to be performed. I've replaced control arms on a multi-link suspension without the need for an alignment but that was not an I-pace. It probably got the car back into alignment too.

You could have an independent shop or dealer just do a check of the alignment as it is, with new tires on, and compare to specifications. Make a decision about getting an alignment with adjustments based on the comparison. I would expect a charge for this as it will take shop time but maybe they'll give you a reduced rate if they don't do any adjustments, or apply the charge to a full alignment. You would have peace of mind instead of wondering "Should I or shouldn't I get an alignment?"
Thanks. I do not mind to pay but just worried if an alignment may actually introduce problems for the cat. For example, what if the specified modes were not set (your 2 and 3)? What if the rear toe locking nuts did not get replaced or not tighten correctly? Maybe I worried too much but we sew too many cases of problems cause by dealers did not understand the I-pace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I need to have my tires replace. Not many shop other than the dealer can do 22 inch tires but I find this shop it can (it claims it is the only local shop that can do "fast spin" balance) but they are not sure if I-Pace needs special tools for alignment. Can anyone answer the question? Should I have the alignment done by the dealer regardless? Thanks

By the way, not much choices for 255/40R22, Pirelli P ZERO Performance Radial Tire- 255/40R22 103V or Continental Premium Contact 6 255/40R22 103V XL (J) Performance Tire. Which one would be your choice? Thanks again
My 2019 IPace came with Pirellis. I have driven 31K miles and all 4 tyres are equally and evenly worn with plenty of tread still left. I love these tyres and strongly recommend them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Dude, this is a normal car!

it will need an alignment periodically. There is no special magic for mounting wheels or balancing them. if a reputable tire shop says they cant do it, find somewhere else because this is a huge red flag. mounting and balancing a tire on a rim is the same whether you are driving a 1962 lincoln, a lamborghini, a pagani or a jaguar i pace. it requires standard, ordinary equipment.

any reputable tire shop should be able to do the work for cheaper than the dealer. if you insist on having the dealer do it, be prepared to pay a bit more.

don't be worried, this is not complicated at all.
 

·
Registered
2019 S with S21B and 16.2
Joined
·
196 Posts
Swapped out tires and had car aligned at a local shop. $100 for the alignment. It was only 0.01 degrees out of spec on one corner and 0.09 degrees out of spec on another corner.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top