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2019 January Ipace, Indus Silver, 22 inch wheels
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Discussion Starter #1
I live in New Zealand and we use 240v mains. I have level 1 and 2 charging it home. If time is of no relevance, is charging at level 1 (2.4kw) better for battery longivity than level 2 (7.2kw)? I understand that the ipace has cooling fans for its battery when it heats up. I have heard them go under both levels of charging initially for a few minutes when you begin charging. Theoretically we all accept that less heat is better for the battery long term. Were possible I avoid level 3 charging unless I need it.

Am I over thinking it? If i need to charge it up and dont intent to use it for, say weekdays, then in principle, level 1 is better for my SOH?

Along those longs I usually drive longer journeys of over 240km for the weekend on the motorway to my hoiday place. When I arrive i have some 25% left. I also have level 1 or 2 charging there at my hoiday home. IS is better to wait an hour or two for the battery to cool down after 2 hour motorway run before charging it?

Any comments appeciated!
 

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Coming from the Tesla world I never heard that level 2 charging would present an issue for battery longevity. Frequent high speed DC charging is another story. Tesla was so concerned about battery longevity and having to pay battery warranty claims, that they significantly slowed the charge rate at SCs for ‘older’ cars. Some also thought that Tesla was concerned about the risk of fire, but they never verbalized that.

Mine was a late 2017 Model S and it apparently fell in the ‘older’ category. I’d hook up to a SC and it would show my car would be finished in 35 minutes. An hour later I was still charging. They decided not to change the algorithm for charging time estimates...as if nobody would notice.

The I-Pace should be no different in terms of battery care. I wouldn’t be concerned about level 2 charging and battery longevity, you’ll be fine. The battery management system should have no problem dealing with level 2. It can also be a bit cheaper to do your charging at level 2 rather than level 1.
 

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2019 January Ipace, Indus Silver, 22 inch wheels
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Discussion Starter #3
Coming from the Tesla world I never heard that level 2 charging would present an issue for battery longevity. Frequent high speed DC charging is another story. Tesla was so concerned about battery longevity and having to pay battery warranty claims, that they significantly slowed the charge rate at SCs for ‘older’ cars. Some also thought that Tesla was concerned about the risk of fire, but they never verbalized that.

Mine was a late 2017 Model S and it apparently fell in the ‘older’ category. I’d hook up to a SC and it would show my car would be finished in 35 minutes. An hour later I was still charging. They decided not to change the algorithm for charging time estimates...as if nobody would notice.

The I-Pace should be no different in terms of battery care. I wouldn’t be concerned about level 2 charging and battery longevity, you’ll be fine. The battery management system should have no problem dealing with level 2. It can also be a bit cheaper to do your charging at level 2 rather than level 1.
Thanks Ken
Any thoughts in terms of IMMEDIATE charging after a long motorway journey? In theory the batteries should be heated? Would it lesson their stress to charge them say a few hours after the journey via a timer?
 

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I’m not sure about that, but I’d think the I-Pace BMS should handle that with no problem. I’d think (hope?) if the battery was too hot to accept a rapid charge, the charge rate would be slow until the battery’s temp was within acceptable range. Think about how many drivers are charging at DC fast chargers while coming right off the highway after a multiple hour drive. In fact I always noticed higher charge rates with a warm battery.

The higher charging levels seem to be throttled with a cold battery until the battery warms. In fact on cold days, if you programmed a SC into the Tesla Nav, the battery would be warmed at a greater rate as you drove to the SC in expectation of the charging, so that charging rates could max out...at least at the beginning.

I never waited for a cool battery with my Tesla to charge at level 2 or 3 and never had an issue. I’d expect the same behavior for the Jag.
 

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As you can see in this chart of a recent charging session, Level 2 charging does not produce a heck of a lot of heat. (Cabin temperature rise is due to sun.) I wouldn't worry about it. DC Fast charging on the other hand ...

3863
 

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2020 I-Pace HSE Indus Silver
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I really do not know if waiting to charge (if you can wait) matters, but I always try to wait 1+ hours after driving before I charge. If I plug in right after a drive, the fans will run for a long time in my I-Pace. When waiting, the fans either do not run at all, or just for a few moments.

It just makes me feel better waiting, so I do ;)
 

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Honestly if you look at extensive battery longevity testing studies there are many factors going into longevity. The total cycles (aging), heat during storage and charging, leaving the battery for very long times at very high or very low SOC, and number of HIGH SPEED DC charging cycles are the ones that are primary. I have never seen anything that shows 3 vs 7KW charging at these battery sizes making any significant difference.
 

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Yes you are over thinking it. Battery can charge at 75+ kW, the 7.5 kW is just a trickle charge.

More important is to not constantly top charge the battery. If you are at 90%+ every day and charging every night... it would be better to run it down a few days then charge in one swoop.
Of course if you are using 60% every day then by all means keep it charged daily.
 
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