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I'm reading an EA receipt from Mesquite NV:

Thank you for charging with Electrify America.

Assistance: 1-833-632-2778

06/02/2019 11:45:25 AM

Walmart 3847 - Mesquite, NV
1120 W Pioneer Blvd
Mesquite, Nevada 89027
Charger #100099-04
Connector #1

Visa : XXXXXXXXXXXX1304
Total paid: $13.73

Session ID: 20250
Transaction ID:3246944218

Charging pricing: $1.00/session + $0.35/minute(pre-tax)

Charging cost: $13.73
Discount: $0.00
Idling: $0.00 ($0.40/minute)
Sales tax (0%): $0.00

End state of charge: 81%
Total energy delivered: 44.8 kWh
Max charging rate: 96.66 kW
Charging time: 00:36:22
Grace period: 00:10 min
Paid idle time: 00:00
------------------------------------------------------------------

0.606 hours supplied 44.8 kWh = 73.9 kW average to 81%
.31 / kWh / 2.474 mi/kWh = $0.125 per mile.
At $3.00 per gallon = 24 mpg at mostly 80 mph. Not bad for a CUV with a big motor.
But in California, we are closer to $4 a gallon, which is 32 mpg.

But the pricing is by minute.
 

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Edit block.

So 74kW yields a correction factor of 1.23 per minute.

We need a way to cap the peak response to <75kW on demand to cut charging fees dramatically.
 

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@McRat - Your receipt from the Mesquite NV charger shows the old pricing:

The new pricing at a max level of 125kW is $1.00/session + $0.69/minute. That almost doubles the price you will pay for that session to $26.10 once they roll it out.
If it will charge at an average of 100kW, I will be happy to pay 0.69. However, our car reports 90-104kW but charges at an average of about 75kW.
 

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My problem with I-Pace and price change is that we are so close to the break point, that the time advantage of running at 84 kW peak is silly. You aren't going to notice the difference.

I sat down and did the actual math. The best case scenario will see <4 minutes advantage of 84 kW charging over 75 kW charging, which would be 10% to 60% SOC charging. Even 84kW is not a flat 84kW during it's period. The period of time where 84 kW is an advantage is never more than 30 minutes, and the average advantage is only 8 kW. The "104 kW" readings reported by EA are very brief and have no effect I can see in charging time. The EVgo 350 kW charger is not slower than the EA 350's even though the EA reports higher. Over double your fees for a 3 minute earlier departure on a 30 minute session?
 

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Go to www.plugshare.com
Go to settings (upper left), and select CCS/SAE only.
They now have a Trip Planner function on the left scroll window near the bottom.
This will show you all the CCS stations on the way, and you can read reviews about them.

You should practice charging near your home a few times, especially if you have more than one carrier. Because doing it in the day time when it's not raining is a lot better for learning.

Typical Method:

Leave the car on with the door open and make sure the cable will reach. Adjust as necessary.
Get your payment method, phone app, credit card, or RFID card ready, and your fob.
Turn off car, open charge door, remove small rubber boot from bottom DC connectors.
Grab cable and insert until it snaps securely.
Follow instructions on the screen, or hold your RFID card on the reader image (looks like a WiFi symbol). Or use your cellphone app. Credit cards require you wait until asked, and remove when asked.
Charging past 85% will start to slow down fairly rapidly. Plan spacing at about 100-125 miles for best travel time. That way you can drive as fast as you like within reason, and always be charging at a faster speed.
Arrive with 20%-30% charge to 75%-85% and you are good to go.
 

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The problem is not with the I-Pace, it is with the EA pricing scheme which is not consumer friendly. You should be paying for the energy you use not for the potential energy you could have used.

Under the new pricing you would be paying $.58/kWh. I know you don't like me posting comparisons to Tesla but the Supercharger network is the only comparable DCFC network in the US. Tesla charges per kWh in every jurisdiction where that is allowed. The average Supercharger rate in the US in $.28/kWh, which is less than half your EA pricing. Where Tesla is forced to charge per minute here are the rates:
$ 0.26 per minute above 60 kW
$ 0.13 per minute at or below 60 kW
This is also less than half the EA pricing.

Hopefully EA will get enough consumer feedback to force them to change their pricing. The one caveat is I don't expect any real competition for EA. The Dieselgate settlement has forced them to build an extensive charging network without have to justify the returns for a $2B capital investment. No competitor has the "luxury" of that which will make it difficult for other charging networks to raise the capital necessary to compete with EA.
In California there are 2 rates structure plans (new) for 2019 for DCFC's. 20-500kW peak demand during any 15 minutes of a month, $0.08 to $0.49 per kWh depending on TOU and season plus $117 meter rental. This was Demand Metered until recently.

For over 500kW peak for any 15 minutes, $0.07-0.045 per kWh + $432 meter rental per month.

I would like to think my letters complaining about the unfair Demand Tariffs had something to do with it. They were much higher for DCFC charging.

Comparing Tesla costs is pointless. Tesla is an anti-profit management system. They lose bucketloads of cash a day on the SC system, something a for-profit corporation cannot endure for a year, much less a decade.
 

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Completely agree. I would set the max charging at 70/75 if it was available on the charger or the vehicle. Not going to notice the time delta.

I must say after looking at the EA app the existing/planned coverage looks pretty good for what I may need.
Although missing for me is NV93 from Vegas to Twin Falls.
Now I know why some Teslas use CHAdeMO on I-15 N of Vegas. CCS/CHAdeMO has better coverage. Even up the 93, while there is only 1 CCS, that 1 more site than Tesla has. You would look for L2 chargers or RV hookups.

But right now, Tesla will take you up via the 15 and CCS will not.
 

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I know Tesla vehicle can throttle L2 charging.... can Tesla likewise throttle L3?
Tesla obviously can throttle at the car or DCFC, but whether they allow any user control, I don't know.
 
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