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Discussion Starter #1
“The electric motors are hollow
permanent magnet machines
which, together with the
concentric transmission, offer the
best power density
and efficiency and the lowest
weight: they give the I-PACE
Concept sports car performance”


Dr Wolfgang Ziebart
Technical Design Director,
Jaguar Land Rover​

Two questions come to mind:


1] Why did Jaguar chose just 2 motors. Hopefully the I-Pace will include some form of torque-vectoring but battery electric vehicles (BEVs) are all about conservation of energy hence 2 motors would imply brake-based torque-vectoring which is counter to the notion of conservation of energy. Dynamic torque-vectoring requires at least 3 motors and ideally 4; applying increased torque to the outer wheel or wheels in a turn and perhaps absorbing regenerative energy from the inside wheel or wheels. My fear is that Jaguar is holding back and what I am describing is the I-Pace 2.0. I for one barely have the funds for the I-Pace 1.0 and believe I only have the one chance to enjoy a vehicle of this ilk - I'll be choked if a 3 motors version appears in year 3 or 5. Anyone any thoughts?​
2] I have read the statement by Jaguar's Technical Director above, dozens of times. I get the use of permanent magnets and can visualize the motors being internally hollow, but "What is a concentric transmission" and "How does this engineering feature - "offer the best power density and efficiency and the lowest weight""? Thoughts?​
 

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We won't be seeing an I-Pace 2.0 for a long time to come so the initial offering from Jaguar is what we'll get. After that, I'm under the specualtion that Jaguar will come out with a more affordable with less performance and possibly less electric range.
 

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I honestly know nothing about the intricacies of electric vehicles and can't answer your questions regarding concentric transmissions. As for two motors, I've always assumed that was the norm, with one motor driving the front two wheels and one driving the rear. Any more and I assume you'd need four, one for each wheel.
 
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