Jaguar I-Pace EV400 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 76 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sort of intrigued by the idea of all-electric. Been trying to (unsuccessfully) find a map of charging stations in the US. Can anyone provide a link?

Looking for any and all advice about one of these, and will also do some more reading here. Never had a Jaguar either. I'm a bit concerned about the apparent lack of space for a spare tire (?), but otherwise the car looks really interesting. I looked at Tesla but don't care for how they don't support apple CarPlay.

Thanks for any helpful info. My main goal here is looking to replace my '95 Buick Riviera.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
plugshare dot com
Then check the CCS box only.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Most will take credit cards, but the ones that don't, you can call the number on the machine and establish an account.

The Jaguar has a premium interior compared to Tesla.

Few cars are coming with spares anymore, but tires are way better than they used to be also. You normally wear tires out before you encounter a failure that strands you. And if you monitor the tires routinely, you will notice a leak. The car will also notify you of a low tire.
There is an optional spare tire kit, but you must stow it in the luggage area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
I would strongly suggest against the iPace if you will need to use public charging points on a regular basis. They are slow and terrible. Once in a while it's fine but if you're relying on public charging on a regular basis.. look Tesla or non-EV.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
The I-Pace is a great commuter/city car and if your longer road trips happen to coincide with the charging infrastructure, and you don’t mind traveling at a more leisurely pace, stopping to charge every ~150 miles at 60-90 minutes/time, it would be a good road car too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Owning an EV with big long range batteries like the I-Pace or Teslas works best if you can charge overnight at your home. For many people including myself charging is not an issue because we plug into our 240v outlets or chargers we had installed at home, and the next morning we start with a full "tank" of energy to use that day. Every day. If you take occasional road trips you will need to use public chargers but otherwise not. If you frequently travel further than your car's range then you are not a good candidate for an EV, as public charging should not be relied on for the bulk of your driving.
 

·
Premium Member
2020 I-Pace HSE Indus Silver
Joined
·
676 Posts
Owning an EV with big long range batteries like the I-Pace or Teslas works best if you can charge overnight at your home. For many people including myself charging is not an issue because we plug into our 240v outlets or chargers we had installed at home, and the next morning we start with a full "tank" of energy to use that day. Every day. If you take occasional road trips you will need to use public chargers but otherwise not. If you frequently travel further than your car's range then you are not a good candidate for an EV, as public charging should not be relied on for the bulk of your driving.
YES!! 100% how I feel and what I did/do with my BMW i3 and now my Jag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks. I looked at that charging website - a bit confusing for someone like myself that knows so little about all this. So how long does it generally take to charge one of these (if nearly completely rundown)? Does the time vary by type of charging station?

Another option I'm considering is a hybrid, and like the Toyota Avalon but, as with so many new cars, hate the aggressive looking grilles. We do longer road trips, so, as has been suggested, perhaps I'm looking at the wrong style. I just like the idea of going more 'green' since my 'carbon footprint' has not been all that great over the years. Looking for something rather unique and special to replace the Buick with.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
So CCS is the only charging station for the I-pace? I assume "supercharger" on the map is solely for Tesla?
That is correct in that CCS is the only ‘fast’ (level 3 or DC) chargers for the I-Pace. The J-1772 chargers are the level 2 (240v, like what you would install at home), sometimes called ‘destination chargers’ are also compatible with the I-Pace.

PlugShare will automatically select those two (as well as 110v wall outlets) when you tell it you drive an I-Pace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Owning an EV with big long range batteries like the I-Pace or Teslas works best if you can charge overnight at your home. For many people including myself charging is not an issue because we plug into our 240v outlets or chargers we had installed at home, and the next morning we start with a full "tank" of energy to use that day. Every day. If you take occasional road trips you will need to use public chargers but otherwise not. If you frequently travel further than your car's range then you are not a good candidate for an EV, as public charging should not be relied on for the bulk of your driving.
Except for occasional road trips (which can often be several hundred miles or more), we pretty much drive locally - short distances - or else within 100-150 miles roundtrip at most. For road trips that original quite far from home, we generally fly and rent a car anyway. We do average, once a year or so, a trip from PA to Rochester NY which is about 270 miles one way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
When you say "telling it you drive an I-Pace", I assume you mean selecting the CCS option...?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
Thanks. I looked at that charging website - a bit confusing for someone like myself that knows so little about all this. So how long does it generally take to charge one of these (if nearly completely rundown)? Does the time vary by type of charging station?

Another option I'm considering is a hybrid, and like the Toyota Avalon but, as with so many new cars, hate the aggressive looking grilles. We do longer road trips, so, as has been suggested, perhaps I'm looking at the wrong style. I just like the idea of going more 'green' since my 'carbon footprint' has not been all that great over the years. Looking for something rather unique and special to replace the Buick with.
If you do longer trips a full electric car is probably not the best choice just yet. Unless you do not mind more frequent and longer stops to fill up than what you need to do in a gas powered car. Tesla’s are in a much better position to do longer trips, but still not as fast/convenient as gas.

For the I-Pace you will take 90-120 minutes to go from near zero to near full. At interstate highway speeds with normal driving and mild weather I wouldn’t plan to go much more than 200 miles. Some are saying they are getting 230 miles or more at steady state highway speeds, but I think those are the outliers. As temps go up or down from mild, your energy use will increase, meaning if it is very hot or very cold, you won’t be driving 200 miles on a single charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
plugshare dot com
Then check the CCS box only.
I see you have Volts? Another car I came up with when searching all-electric. Tell me about it. Surely isn't in the same league as the I-Pace? If I'm correct, it has far less range.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
When you say "telling it you drive an I-Pace", I assume you mean selecting the CCS option...?
You can manually select CCS, sure. What I was referring to is setting up a profile in PlugShare, you tell the program what you drive and it automatically filters to just the compatible chargers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Thanks. I looked at that charging website - a bit confusing for someone like myself that knows so little about all this. So how long does it generally take to charge one of these (if nearly completely rundown)? Does the time vary by type of charging station?

Another option I'm considering is a hybrid, and like the Toyota Avalon but, as with so many new cars, hate the aggressive looking grilles. We do longer road trips, so, as has been suggested, perhaps I'm looking at the wrong style. I just like the idea of going more 'green' since my 'carbon footprint' has not been all that great over the years. Looking for something rather unique and special to replace the Buick with.
Yes, there certainly is a learning curve with EV charging. Most CCS stations are 50kW (speed). The newer sites like Electrify America (often found in Walmart parking lots), will push up to 350kW, but our cars will only charge at ~80 kW average speed, with a 111 kW peak (which is brief).

Normally you drive 100-150 miles, take an hour charging break, rinse and repeat. Most my stops actually come in at 45 minutes. The last 15% takes a long time, so you drive until you reach 10-25% (safety factor), pump it up to 80%, then take off again.

If you do a lot of long hauls, but also want to be 'green' around town commuting, you might also look at Plug-In Hybrids (PHEV). Toyota RAV4 PHEV, Honda Clarity PHEV, Chrysler Pacifica PHEV, Cadillac CT6 PHEV, and others. These you plug in each night at home with the included charger, and when the charge runs out, the gas engine extends your range. The Toyota Prime PHEV is the most common but... pretty gutless, especially in the mountains.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
If you do longer trips a full electric car is probably not the best choice just yet. Unless you do not mind more frequent and longer stops to fill up than what you need to do in a gas powered car. Tesla’s are in a much better position to do longer trips, but still not as fast/convenient as gas.

For the I-Pace you will take 90-120 minutes to go from near zero to near full. At interstate highway speeds with normal driving and mild weather I wouldn’t plan to go much more than 200 miles. Some are saying they are getting 230 miles or more at steady state highway speeds, but I think those are the outliers. As temps go up or down from mild, your energy use will increase, meaning if it is very hot or very cold, you won’t be driving 200 miles on a single charge.
Great info...thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
I see you have Volts? Another car I came up with when searching all-electric. Tell me about it. Surely isn't in the same league as the I-Pace? If I'm correct, it has far less range.
Volts have an EPA rated 52 miles of All Electric Range (AER), and roughly 400 miles total range with gas tank filled.

I love Volts. Best bang for the buck in a green car that's not gutless. It's actually a 52 mile EV with a gasoline range extender holding 9 gallons. You plug it in at night, but if you forget, no biggie. It runs as a hybrid if you don't charge it, but runs like an EV if you do. Alas 2019 was the last model year, and it's best of the breed.

If you test drive a PHEV, make sure it's charged up for the test drive. Many dealers forget to charge to them, and the performance is not as good with no charge. The Volt is the only PHEV that puts out full acceleration without turning on the gas engine.
 

·
Registered
2019 FE Photon Red
Joined
·
453 Posts
Except for occasional road trips (which can often be several hundred miles or more), we pretty much drive locally - short distances - or else within 100-150 miles roundtrip at most. For road trips that original quite far from home, we generally fly and rent a car anyway. We do average, once a year or so, a trip from PA to Rochester NY which is about 270 miles one way.
Definitely take one for a test drive - you'll love it.
Your usage seems similar to mine. Usually local/suburban driving with occasional longer trips into NJ and MD. I also have done and intend to do 2-3 times a year trips from eastern PA to either upstate NY or Montreal. Last such trip to Montreal was a fun drive adding maybe 2hrs of charging to the 450mile eachway trip. As an EV driver I've learnt to relax and enjoy the breaks.
 
1 - 20 of 76 Posts
Top