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So another post from me looking for this group’s sage perspective on battery state of Heath . I am considered a new 2020 I Pace that been on their lot for 6 months . I received the below when I asked for the Pathfinder state of health report . This shows both a SoH capacity fade (90%) and SoH power fade (100%). I assume capacity fade is the most relevant as that tells me it’s capacity to hold a charge - is that correct ? Why does the power fade tell me?

I’ve recently gotten three of these all around 90 to 92 percent capacity fade , both from 2019 and 2020 models . One Dealer technician told me this is normal in his experience and he has not seen 100 percent capacity fade SOH. I assumed a newer 2020 model would be closer to 100% or high 90s% at least

what is really normal here ? Are all these vehicle just sitting too long and eroding the battery capacity fade ? Thanks for any views
 

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Yes, capacity fade is just that. Power fade is probably the max current that can be drawn.

Very interesting data point! If they sit on the lot they lose capacity ...
I think I and some others here believe that there's a chance that a 90% capacity could be resurrected to something higher by proper cell balancing ... it's just been sitting and not really taxed, so maybe it's a bit out of whack.

To me the bottom line is, how much $$ off is a 2019 compared to a new 2020? I would weigh the discount strongly and not worry about 10% loss .. the battery will probably last just as long as that of a really new one. Plus you do have the warranty if something really goes awry.
 

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Thanks . I’ve now seen this on both 2020 and 2019 models all sitting on lots at least 6 months. Not sure I now see the advantage of a 2020 from a battery health standpoint. I am still waiting on one other report .

I am seeing 14k off Msrp for 2020 HSEs and 20-22k off 2019 HSEs

I was convinced 2020 was worth the extra for the battery health but that now seems like a false distinction
 

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Do we know for sure that a few charge/discharge cycles won’t bring these numbers higher? I just have to wonder how accurate these numbers would be upon first testing a battery that’s been ‘risen from the dead’ after sitting there for nearly a year. I’ve always been under the impression, owning a Tesla, that’s it‘s the number of charge-discharge cycles that ages the battery.

Obviously a higher use of DC charging & temperature will also impact battery life & capacity. But I’m having trouble understanding why simply sitting there, unused, would so impact capacity and general battery health. I never recall seeing a discussion like that on the Tesla forums.

I have a vested interest in this since I’m picking up a new 2019 that’s been sitting there too for quite some time. Getting $20,000 off of sticker was a good motivation for waking this puppy up from its deep sleep. :)
 

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Once you get it, charge it to 100% with level 2 charger. The next step is to power it on, but not "start". Put foot on brake pedal, put other foot on go pedal, and press both down all the way for at least 10 seconds to reset its range estimating. The car will probably show a high range of driving is possible. Ignore it. It won't be accurate. Drive it normally and charge it normally a few times and it will adapt to its new surroundings and driver(s). The guessed range will become more reasonable.

It would be interesting to see the health report after a few months of real world driving.

All batteries deplete some charge over time, and the chemicals of the battery contents will also react a little. That's the nature of the world.
I've had simple alkaline batteries alleged to be good for "10 years" turn up bad in an opened package that had sat unused for a few months.
 

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Once you get it, charge it to 100% with level 2 charger. The next step is to power it on, but not "start". Put foot on brake pedal, put other foot on go pedal, and press both down all the way for at least 10 seconds to reset its range estimating. The car will probably show a high range of driving is possible. Ignore it. It won't be accurate. Drive it normally and charge it normally a few times and it will adapt to its new surroundings and driver(s). The guessed range will become more reasonable.

It would be interesting to see the health report after a few months of real world driving.

All batteries deplete some charge over time, and the chemicals of the battery contents will also react a little. That's the nature of the world.
I've had simple alkaline batteries alleged to be good for "10 years" turn up bad in an opened package that had sat unused for a few months.
Agreed and thanks for the tip. I do think after a few cycles the 'health' would improve. What I'm wondering about is how much of a charge capacity depletion is the result of numerous cycles of charge/discharge vs a car just sitting on the lot unused. My guess is the impact would be more the result of the # of cycles and the car that sits there, simply idle, would suffer less degradation, though some. I don't profess to know this for sure, but from what I've read over the years on the Tesla forum, that seems to be more the thinking there.
 
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