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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going on my 2nd week with the new car and loving it. I'm still trying to get used to the range estimates and figuring out how much charge and range I'm using each day on my commute. I would love to hear what your daily usage and range estimates are as well as any tips on what values you find the most reliable.
 

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2019 S with S21B and 16.2
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What I do: I keep an eye on battery percentage. At first assume 2 miles for every percent remaining. As you drive more you will learn the different situations that will give you 1.5 miles or worse for every percent (like really cold, really fast driving, uphill, headwind, lots of short trips with long stops in between, etc.) You will also learn what gets you 2.5 to 3 miles for every percent (slow driving with few braking events, mild temperatures, downhill, one long trip starting from a garage and leaving just as the battery is 100%, tailwind, etc.)
 

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The GoM is not bad outside of unusual circumstances

 

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The GOM is a best guess... Take it as it worth.

I usually take a look at the battery % (when I use the embedded GPS, I set up an overlay map to display the entire trip from where the car is and destination. In that case I see the current battery % and predicted % at destination).
My dash set up is similar to this one. When I start my journey, I remember the GOM value at the begining, and I always mentaly add remaining value on GOM and real travelled distance. If the sum of remaining value on GOM + travelled distance > initial GOM value, I know that I will be able to do more than initial GOM value, and if the sum is less, I know I will be short compared to original GOM value.

 

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Burdito ... given where you and I live, a huge issue for us this time of year is the charge loss from cabin HVAC and battery cooling. If you precondition, that battery draw does not factor in to your trip log, so keep that in mind if you are preconditioning and it seems like the SOC is dropping more than it should based on the logs. If I precondition, then I can still see some decent 32 or 33 kWh/100 miles efficiency numbers for my commute even in the summer. If I don't, then it can get up to 38 or even 39 kWh/100 miles. In the Winter under perfect conditions, I can get down to 28 kWh/100 miles. Percentage wise, that's a pretty big spread.

If you are watching your kWh/100 miles, you should also be aware that the distance of your commute matters. Unless you are in perfect conditions, the car will be dumping electrons to heat or cool the battery pack as well as the cabin when you initially turn on the car. Accordingly, on a hot or cold day, you will see horrible efficiency numbers for your first several minutes of the drive. If I don't precondition, then I can easily see consumption spike to 50+ kWh/100 miles on a hot day that will gradually trend down as I complete my drive home. The longer your commute, the more you will average out that initial energy dump for cabin and battery temperature regulation. I frequently take my wife to MCO for business trips and that is a 24 mile round trip. I've managed to get down to 25 kWh/100 miles on that longer trip, but I've never seen that number on my short five-mile commute.

For these reasons, it is difficult to compare consumption numbers where temp, terrain, and length of commute can all be different and all have a significant impact on efficiency. All that I can tell you is that if you pay attention, you'll get to know your car and you'll have a feel for how far you can go between charges based on environmental factors, speed and driving style. Until you have that comfort level, assume that the car can only go 150 miles on a full charge and don't stress about it. For me, I know that I can comfortably go 220 miles if I keep consumption at or below 38 kWh/100 miles. That may require slowing down a bit or drafting on the interstate, but I know that's doable.
 

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After three months I figured out that the lighting control stalk on the left hand side of the steering wheel has a button on the end. When you push the button a section of the lower right side of the display changes to show things like date, consumption, and other signs that I don’t know what they mean.

not sure if 2020s have this feature. It might be a PIVI pro thing.

Its kinda fun to watch my instant consumption go from 4 mi/kWh to -40 mi/kwh!
 

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I usually average out to less than 2mi/kw on my monthly reading from my wall kilowatt meter on the charging supply. This value has the total kw required to charge the car, including the heat losses involved in charging. A freak test driving down the beach road late one night got me over 4mi/kw from doing 35 to 45 mph.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Burdito ... given where you and I live, a huge issue for us this time of year is the charge loss from cabin HVAC and battery cooling. If you precondition, that battery draw does not factor in to your trip log, so keep that in mind if you are preconditioning and it seems like the SOC is dropping more than it should based on the logs. If I precondition, then I can still see some decent 32 or 33 kWh/100 miles efficiency numbers for my commute even in the summer. If I don't, then it can get up to 38 or even 39 kWh/100 miles. In the Winter under perfect conditions, I can get down to 28 kWh/100 miles. Percentage wise, that's a pretty big spread.

If you are watching your kWh/100 miles, you should also be aware that the distance of your commute matters. Unless you are in perfect conditions, the car will be dumping electrons to heat or cool the battery pack as well as the cabin when you initially turn on the car. Accordingly, on a hot or cold day, you will see horrible efficiency numbers for your first several minutes of the drive. If I don't precondition, then I can easily see consumption spike to 50+ kWh/100 miles on a hot day that will gradually trend down as I complete my drive home. The longer your commute, the more you will average out that initial energy dump for cabin and battery temperature regulation. I frequently take my wife to MCO for business trips and that is a 24 mile round trip. I've managed to get down to 25 kWh/100 miles on that longer trip, but I've never seen that number on my short five-mile commute.

For these reasons, it is difficult to compare consumption numbers where temp, terrain, and length of commute can all be different and all have a significant impact on efficiency. All that I can tell you is that if you pay attention, you'll get to know your car and you'll have a feel for how far you can go between charges based on environmental factors, speed and driving style. Until you have that comfort level, assume that the car can only go 150 miles on a full charge and don't stress about it. For me, I know that I can comfortably go 220 miles if I keep consumption at or below 38 kWh/100 miles. That may require slowing down a bit or drafting on the interstate, but I know that's doable.
Found the kwh/100 miles setting and used it on the way home. My commute is only 8 miles each way so it was hovering around 50kw/100 on the way home with the ac blasting. So far Ive been using about 12% per work day but I also take my half hour lunch in my car every day so thats certainly not helping haha. Its still plenty of range for my uses. Just looks like I will have to charge a bit more often than I thought. Still only costing about 25% of what I would be spending on gas though!

After three months I figured out that the lighting control stalk on the left hand side of the steering wheel has a button on the end. When you push the button a section of the lower right side of the display changes to show things like date, consumption, and other signs that I don’t know what they mean.

not sure if 2020s have this feature. It might be a PIVI pro thing.

Its kinda fun to watch my instant consumption go from 4 mi/kWh to -40 mi/kwh!
Found the button on my 2019 and it works just like you said. Quite nifty!
 
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Found the kwh/100 miles setting and used it on the way home. My commute is only 8 miles each way so it was hovering around 50kw/100 on the way home with the ac blasting. So far Ive been using about 12% per work day but I also take my half hour lunch in my car every day so thats certainly not helping haha. Its still plenty of range for my uses. Just looks like I will have to charge a bit more often than I thought. Still only costing about 25% of what I would be spending on gas though!


Found the button on my 2019 and it works just like you said. Quite nifty!
Great!
Now can you find out what all those different things mean? Lol

actually there is only one I don’t know:
Building Font Urban design Automotive exterior Electronic device
 

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19 I-pace HSE Polaris/Fuji white with most options and a lot of accessories
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After three months I figured out that the lighting control stalk on the left hand side of the steering wheel has a button on the end. When you push the button a section of the lower right side of the display changes to show things like date, consumption, and other signs that I don’t know what they mean.

not sure if 2020s have this feature. It might be a PIVI pro thing.

Its kinda fun to watch my instant consumption go from 4 mi/kWh to -40 mi/kwh!
And if you press and hold the button for a few seconds it resets the data. If you see A:... you're using the "Trip A" bank of info. If you see B:... you're using "Trip B" bank of info.

Reference "Using the trip computer" in your owner's manual or iGuide.
 
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