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Discussion Starter #1
Like many others I am anxiously waiting delivery so I can take my I-pace for a spin and see what it can do. However the manual wants us to wait for 3,000 km before the fun begins. My question to those more technically aware than I,
“Is Jaguar being overly cautious?”

The manual states,
“The vehicle is built using high-precision manufacturing methods, but the moving parts of the electrical system must still bed-in, relative to each other. The bedding-in process occurs mainly in the first 3 000 km of operation.

During the running-in period of 3 000 km, observe and follow the instructions below:
Do notfully press the accelerator pedal during starts and normal driving.
Gradually increase road speeds.
Avoid continuous operation at high speed and abrupt stops.
Avoid frequent cold starts followed by short-distance driving.
Preferably take longer journeys.
Do not participate in track days, sports driving schools, or any similar events.”
 

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Is that original language for the I-Pace? Or is it copied from the F-Pace manual?
"avoid frequent cold starts followed by short-distance driving" seems out of place for an EV.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Agreed
But that is directly from the online i-Pace owner’s manual. Located in the maintenance chapter
 

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From the F-Pace manual

The vehicle is built using high-precision manufacturing methods, but the moving parts of the engine must still break-in, relative to each other. The process occurs mainly in the first 2 000 miles (3 000 km) of operation.

During this breaking-in period of 2 000 miles (3 000 km), observe and follow the instructions below:
Do not fully press the accelerator pedal during starts and normal driving.
Avoid high engine speeds (rpm) until the engine has reached its full operating temperature.
Avoid laboring the engine by operating the engine in too high a gear at low speeds.
Gradually increase engine and road speeds.
Avoid continuous operation at high engine speed and abrupt stops.
Avoid frequent cold starts followed by short-distance driving.
Preferably take longer trips.
Do not participate in track days, sports driving schools, or any similar events.
 

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"Do not participate in track days, sports driving schools, or any similar events." LOL! Like don't do what Jaguar did when they brought in hundreds of car journalists to Portugal to test drive the I-Pace on the Portimao Circuit Race Track a few months ago, haha. :D
 

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"Do not participate in track days, sports driving schools, or any similar events." LOL! Like don't do what Jaguar did when they brought in hundreds of car journalists to Portugal to test drive the I-Pace on the Portimao Circuit Race Track a few months ago, haha. :D
The only MFR that I know of who supports use of their cars on closed circuits is Chevrolet for their Camaro and Corvette models.
Porsche, Ferrari, Audi, Ford, Dodge, Tesla, all Japanese brands, all Korean brands all have wording that says they will void your warranty for tracking their cars. Cadillac takes repairs on a case-by-case basis. Subaru actually used social media and the SCCA website to collect lists of owners to withhold warranty work. They caught a lot of flak over that.

I had both a Camaro and a Corvette that were heavily tracked in box stock trim, and they would do warranty work even though I told them I AutoX'd and dragraced the cars. Even a $125,000 Chevrolet was covered (ZR1). Power steering broke on the Camaro, and the Corvette lost it's clutch hydraulics. A Cadillac lost it's supercharger drag racing (CTS-V) and they covered that too.

Cliff Notes: Do not volunteer info during service, or post under your real name on social media. The SCCA will allow you to exclude the car model if you wish. Do that.
 
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So I googled around a bit and could not find any useful info on breaking in an electric motor/vehicle. Nothing on the Tesla sites. Here's one question from a Tesla forum dude: "I am sure I will floor my P85D as soon as I get my key fob.. But how come we don't need to wait x number of miles before we put that stress on the motor?" The answers are a variation of "you don't need to worry about it".

Maybe some of the Tesla fanboys who are lurking here have some insight into that?
 

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Having modded sports in the past and having tracked (just straight line 1/4 mi., no regular track), I can say that I've done it both ways in previous vehicles...been easy on the car and "drove it like I stole it from day 1." In my experience, it makes no difference at all and your vehicle will still be under warranty no matter what. Just my opinion. Having said all that, I won't be taking my I-Pace to the track as I have my GT-R if I want to do that kid of thing; my I-Pace will be my daily driver - my work vehicle and family vehicle and I'm sure I will have plenty of fun with it and calmly cruise long distances on the highway just the same. :)
 

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To the best of my knowledge, electric motors require no break in from an engineering perspective. There are no rings to seat, no crush-type plain bearings, no valve seats, followers, cams, etc. Just roller bearings which do not require break in. Perhaps the reduction gear seating? Nobody has worried about normal gear seating in decades due to improvements in metallurgy and mfg'g practices, except hypoid gears that have a lot of heat losses and will get hotter during seating than they normally would. Even then, it's pretty rare. Hypoid gears aren't used in EVs.

Electronics and batteries decay from day one. They are the strongest they will ever be the first day. Hence why you burn-in electronics instead of break-in. You want to see if they will fail by overloading them when they are at their best.
 

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I cannot remember the last time I bothered to burn in electronics. Things are so cheap and disposable nowadays. I don't even expect a $2000 computer to last 3 years without a lot of maintenance work, and I'm on my second Alienware mobo.
 

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Having picked up my 90D Tesla in 2015 I was given the keys and the salesman said " have fun" . On the way home from delivery I was driving 120 on Auto Pilot! I had fun..Sometimes less said is better!
 
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