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So company T pushed out a software update that reduced vehicle range https://insideevs.com/news/356300/tesla-battery-protection-update-reduces-range/.

That got me thinking:
- Can a company intentionally push out an update that effects the MPGe that was in effect at the time of purchase, positive or negative, and not tell the owner?
- Can a company intentionally push out an update that changes the range with the effect to be a prevention of a battery warranty claim?

The numbers here are only for concept discussion. Any resemblance to a real situation in the past, present or future is purely coincidental.

Think of this: You buy a vehicle with a stated MPGe as 100. An update is pushed out and now the vehicle only has a 90 MPGe. Is this like ICE engine re-stated MPG figures caused by various factors such as faulty testing or intentional falsification? Has this update also affected the maximum chargeable battery capacity (lowered it) and thus also lowers the capacity limit of the warranty? That is if 100kW was the original capacity and 75% (75kW) was the original warranty, and with a new chargeable capacity of 90kW would it have a warranty capacity of 67.5kW. Has the owner been cheated?

Think of this: Car is given an 8 year/100,000 mile warranty for 75% remaining capacity at time of purchase new. The car is used a lot. Manufacturer has data on the car. Manufacturer pushes out an update that intentionally fudges the figures so that it never drops to 75% in a display on their own or any other brand diagnostic tool. Manufacturer disallows any claim by blaming driver's use for lack of capacity/driving range.

You get the concepts? I'm sure there are other scenarios that could be conjured up.

How could this be policed/diagnosed for any EV?
 

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Well, it would psis me off but the legality of it would likely be decided by a class action lawsuit if enough people are psissed off.

I'm not surprised that company T is pulling this carp now ... because battery life is actually starting to matter to their reputation now that lots of their cars have been on the road for a few years. JLR, Audi, Daimler started out more conservatively. Which is funny because now you get i-Pace owners complaining about how their range should be higher. Well, it's a trade-off. Get a bit more range at the cost of shorter battery life ... get longer battery life at the cost of shorter range. Pretty simple logic, really.
 
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