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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I had a Tesla and used an adapter for my Jaguar I PACE. Usually the highest charge I get is between 216 and 222. I think once it got to 240, surprise. Has anyone else used an adapter rather than putting in a new Jaguar charging device? Is this a common problem?
Thank you.
 

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Can you explain what the problem is?
By any chance, do you have an Android device on which you can install WattCat so that you can see the battery charge in kWh?
 

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WattCat tells me that my usable battery capacity is around 80.5 kwh. Wish I got the suggested 84, but never get there. WattCat also tells me my battery health is 99%. Any chance I've got a bad battery?
 

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WattCat tells me that my usable battery capacity is around 80.5 kwh. Wish I got the suggested 84, but never get there. WattCat also tells me my battery health is 99%. Any chance I've got a bad battery?
I live in a cold weather state with nighttime temps below freezing. Cold has an impact on charging. Since my H264 update, my max charge has been 82 kWh but usually 80-81. Depending upon your ambient temperature 80.5 is okay.
 

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Hi All,
Usually the highest charge I get is between 216 and 222. I think once it got to 240, surprise.
When you say "between 216 and 222" I assume you mean estimated range in miles at 100% charge. If so, it sounds like your issue is that you are expecting to use the predicted range as measure of state of charge in order to determine that the charger is working. The estimated range is not a measure of state of charge and isn't really a useful measure for what it appears you're trying to determine.

Is your car reporting 100% battery capacity when it stops charging? If so, that's probably evidence enough that your adapter and charger are both working as expected. There were some reported issues that the i-pace was not compatible with Tesla destination chargers under certain circumstances, but by and large I would expect your Tesla home charger plus adapter to work fine, which it sounds like it is.

Whether or not your battery has lost capacity is a different question, and there is no one better qualified to answer that question than @sciencegeek
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Battery

Thank you all. I am not a tech person - so kWh - don’t know how to determine that. Yes, battery shows fully charged at between 216 and 222. I wasn’t going to get a Jaguar installation unless necessary. Think I am OK.
 

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I do not. IPHONE 11. Now I am beginning to understand that what is shown as range is not necessarily the state of charge, whatever that means. But thanks all. LOVE the IPACE. If I can help any of you with travel questions, let me have it!! PM me. (Just a hobby).
 

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I do not. IPHONE 11. Now I am beginning to understand that what is shown as range is not necessarily the state of charge, whatever that means. But thanks all. LOVE the IPACE. If I can help any of you with travel questions, let me have it!! PM me. (Just a hobby).
If you're worried about your battery health then your best bet is to start logging how much energy your charger is putting into the battery. The unit of energy measurement is called kilowatt hours (kWh). This is the same measurement your electricity provider uses to determine your bill.

Log what % ( state of charge) your battery was at when you started charging, how much energy your charger put into the battery, and what % your battery was at when you stopped charging. Your charging app will tell you how much it put into the battery and the Jaguar app called InControl Remote will tell you what % full is the battery. It's almost like knowing what your fuel state is in a normal car. If you report back on this forum, members can do the math and tell you if everything looks okay.

The range prediction system on the I-Pace is not accurate and please don't rely on it for a long trip. I've found that the range displayed on the touchscreen and instrument panel is optimistic by 15% or 30-45 miles that I don't really have.

The best way to figure your real range is to keep track of what % your battery is at when you start a trip and what % it's at on trip end. Subtract the two numbers. Divide the # of miles travelled by the change in battery % and multiply by 100. For example: if you start with battery at 100% and end at 80% you've used 20%. If you travelled 40 miles, divide 40 by 20. You are getting 2 miles per 1% of battery energy used or 200 miles of real range. Sorry for long explanation.
 

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I do not. IPHONE 11. Now I am beginning to understand that what is shown as range is not necessarily the state of charge, whatever that means. But thanks all. LOVE the IPACE. If I can help any of you with travel questions, let me have it!! PM me. (Just a hobby).
State of charge (you may also see it abbreviated as SoC) is just a fancy way of saying how much charge your battery has, as a percent of full. For example: when your battery is fully charged, it's at 100% SoC, when it's halfway charged, it's 50% SoC, and when it's fully discharged it's 0% SoC, and so on.

The remaining range calculation (this is the 216 - 222 miles) is a guess made by the car as to how far you can drive with the amount of energy remaining in your battery. It's based in part on variable things like your past driving habits, the weather, etc. Because of this variability, it is expected that not every charge to 100% is going to produce the same estimated range.

All in all, it sounds to me like your car and charger are working just fine and everything is as it should be, and you're enjoying the car, which is the most important part! If you start to notice that you're not actually able to drive nearly as far on a full charge as you think you should be able to (e.g. you drain your batter from full to empty in 100 miles of driving) then it's time to start learning about kWh and monitoring your charging input.
 
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