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I started my I-Pace with my 14amp Lithium Iron battery this morning and drove it 12 miles to the dealer with no problems. Sunday, I had my starter battery go down to 3 volts shortly after driving it home from a 6 mile drive. I used the same type wiring harnesses remote wires that were suggested by AyePace. The dealer tested everything and they have ordered both the starter & the aux batteries to replace them. They gave me an approximate 5 days for them to arrive. My current batteries were not in good enough shape to do the testing they wanted to do. Told them I would drive the car back home until they got the batteries. I did and the car ran like normal except the dash was all set to the default settings. The Service Manger came out to watch me start the car. I pulled the little LIP battery out of my knapsack, set it on the windshield, pulled the wiring out of the windshield cowl, plugged the battery in, walked around and got in the drivers seat, depressed the brake pedal, pushed the start button, pushed neutral, set the parking brake, got out of the car, unplugged the battery, put the battery back in its box. All less than a minute. I was ready to go. The look on the service manager face was classic. The car shows no noticeable problems when running. I believe I will be going to lunch in it this week. This web site is great!馃憤
I thought if you get out the car, it will shut down. In any case, can you share information or a link of the little battery? Thanks.
 

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This whole concept came to a lightbulb moment. Why don't we just jumper from the other battery to get things going?
I have two reasons for not jumpering the main 12v battery from the Aux battery, if I were to find the car dead and locked. One is that the emergency start cable (renamed from the Ayepace cable :)) provides easier access to a dead car, when compared to the emergency procedures for opening the door and the bonnet.

The other reason is down to my own ignorance about the electrical system in this car. Some I-Pace battery systems manage their batteries perfectly, even keeping them up to snuff during long-term storage... while other seemingly-identical cars don't. So I'm reluctant to connect anything that's not normally connected, fearing that I'll end up in the latter category.

In this case, your suggestion is so logical and obvious that it makes me wonder why JLR would not have implemented such a simple design change to gain access to the car...
 

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[QUOTE[email protected]] I thought if you get out the car, it will shut down. In any case, can you share information or a link of the little battery? Thanks. [/QUOTE]

The car won't shutdown if you put it in neutral. You would be well advised to also put the parking brake on also, although it is not required. The car will stay running for about 13 minutes and then a message will pop up to push the brake pedal or the car will shutdown. The battery is a lithium Iron Phosphate battery( Shorai LFX14A1-BS12) the same 14 amp as the Aux battery in our car. It's CCamps are slightly greater than our Aux battery. It is mentioned elseware in the forum. There are a number of companies selling LIP batteries in addition to the Shorai. I made sure everything else was turned off in the car prior to hooking the battery up to it.
 

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After successfully jump starting my I-Pace, that has a failed starter battery, about 10 times(with the Ayepace inspired rig), I tried starting it today. The car lit up, but when I hit the start button, everything blacked out. Some investigation showed my jumper battery ok. There are two fuses involved, one on the starter battery jumper rig in the car and one on the jumper bolted to the jumper battery. (same rig design as the in car jumper). The 15 amp fuse on the in car jumper wiring rig was blown. The 15 amp fuse on my battery jumper rig was not blown. I replaced the blown fuse with another 15 amp fuse. It is the biggest fuse I had laying around. The car started up ok the second time. I have now replaced both 15 amp fuses with 25 amp fuses. Since this is a small time frame load, I have no problem believing I will melt any lines within a 1 minute time frame. A direct short could be as high as 210amp(jumper battery rating.) The 25 amp fuse should easily dump that load pretty quickly. Have tried the new fuses starting the car and it works ok. I did run into an issue testing the rig with an ohmmeter. I found that some of the fuse cover housing rubber had gotten in the fuse blade slots preventing a good connection. I dug the loose rubber out with a wire then, twisted 1 of the fuse blades slightly to make a tighter connection.
 

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After successfully jump starting my I-Pace, that has a failed starter battery, about 10 times(with the Ayepace inspired rig), I tried starting it today. The car lit up, but when I hit the start button, everything blacked out. Some investigation showed my jumper battery ok. There are two fuses involved, one on the starter battery jumper rig in the car and one on the jumper bolted to the jumper battery. (same rig design as the in car jumper). The 15 amp fuse on the in car jumper wiring rig was blown. The 15 amp fuse on my battery jumper rig was not blown. I replaced the blown fuse with another 15 amp fuse. It is the biggest fuse I had laying around. The car started up ok the second time. I have now replaced both 15 amp fuses with 25 amp fuses. Since this is a small time frame load, I have no problem believing I will melt any lines within a 1 minute time frame. A direct short could be as high as 210amp(jumper battery rating.) The 25 amp fuse should easily dump that load pretty quickly. Have tried the new fuses starting the car and it works ok. I did run into an issue testing the rig with an ohmmeter. I found that some of the fuse cover housing rubber had gotten in the fuse blade slots preventing a good connection. I dug the loose rubber out with a wire then, twisted 1 of the fuse blades slightly to make a tighter connection.
Since I was never sure if the issue (the 3 times my battery failed) was the battery, the battery maintenance when the car was off or when the car was running, I would leave the jumper battery connected for a few minutes to give the starter and aux batteries a bit of charge before starting up. That way, the batteries can provide for some of the load at startup rather than ask the jumper battery to charge the starter battery, the aux battery and all the electronics all at once (are the starter and aux batteries tied together or is there some switch that goes to the aux when the started battery gets too low?).
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Both batteries are connected to the power supply distribution box. They do not connect directly together. The PSDB contains the contactors to send power to the each battery as needed. The PSDB gets its 12V supply from the battery junction box which gets its 12V supply from the DC-DC converter. Actually, the "12V" is supposed to be close to 14V.
 

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Both batteries are connected to the power supply distribution box. They do not connect directly together. The PSDB contains the contactors to send power to the each battery as needed. The PSDB gets its 12V supply from the battery junction box which gets its 12V supply from the DC-DC converter. Actually, the "12V" is supposed to be close to 14V.
So when the car dies, are both the starter and aux batteries dead? I used a booster to revive the car 3 times (twice to allow me to drive it on the flatbed rather than have it dragged) by connecting it to the aux battery alone, so not sure what roller the starter battery plays in all this. Does the PSDB use the starter primarily and switch to the aux if the primary goes down, or do they serve different purposes? Once the car is running, are the batteries essentially taken off line (other than to charge them) or are all the electronics going through the battery and DC-DC converter in parallel (so the battery acts as a buffer)? Just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Per the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, the starter battery will provide 12V for everything except brake booster, parking lock, and front EPIC. The aux battery provides 12V needed for the latter three. Once the car powers up, the DC-DC converter draws power from the traction battery to provide all 12V power and charge 12V batteries as needed.

I would expect the batteries to act as buffers and be "stand-by" in case of DC-DC converter or traction battery failures. One has to have enough power to run electronics to get off the road safely, but not enough energy for motive power.

Per your description, it reads like an aux battery failure will prevent the front parking lock, the front motor and power brake boost from operating. Boosting the aux battery as you did allowed the car to start since the car sensed enough power from the aux battery which was actually the booster. The starter battery was good enough to power the rest (door locks, turning on the car, etc.) until the DC-DC converter provided 12V power. The PSDB senses the aux battery voltage and feeds the info to the BSM/GWM. BSM/GWM makes the decisions about operating the vehicle.
 

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Per the workshop manual and wiring diagrams, the starter battery will provide 12V for everything except brake booster, parking lock, and front EPIC. The aux battery provides 12V needed for the latter three. Once the car powers up, the DC-DC converter draws power from the traction battery to provide all 12V power and charge 12V batteries as needed.

I would expect the batteries to act as buffers and be "stand-by" in case of DC-DC converter or traction battery failures. One has to have enough power to run electronics to get off the road safely, but not enough energy for motive power.

Per your description, it reads like an aux battery failure will prevent the front parking lock, the front motor and power brake boost from operating. Boosting the aux battery as you did allowed the car to start since the car sensed enough power from the aux battery which was actually the booster. The starter battery was good enough to power the rest (door locks, turning on the car, etc.) until the DC-DC converter provided 12V power. The PSDB senses the aux battery voltage and feeds the info to the BSM/GWM. BSM/GWM makes the decisions about operating the vehicle.
Thanked for the clarifications. I am still la bit confused though. The times I had the failures, the failures definitely looked like the starter battery as the car went into delirium throwing errors left and right before shutting down completely(so all the electronics). Boosting only the aux battery resolved that all allowed the car to start up and be driven on the flatbed. At lest once, I had to leave the booster on the aux battery several minutes for it to get enough juice to start up and stay on for more than a minute or so.
 

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My failure is only on the starter battery. But WattCat is following the starter battery voltage, even though it says "Aux battery". The Aux battery is just below 14 volts every time I check it with a meter. Although the dealer insinuated they were going to change both batteries. Today I drove the car to my local trail and ran it, then went to lunch in it even though it has a starter battery at 6 volts. Figuring out how to make the locks work has been a puzzle as the car resets everything to the default mode when you shut it down.
 

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I have a failed starting battery. My dealer called me yesterday and has my new starter and aux battery that just came in (it took 3 days to get them)(they are going to replace both of them).Appointment is next Wednesday. After a 30 mile drive to the bike trail and back today successfully, using a small jumper battery hooked to the starter battery to get the car running, I decided to charge the traction battery up on the 120vac charger at home. I was to meet my wife for pizza a few hours later and disconnected the traction charger and hooked up my jumper battery to the starter battery to get the car running. Something was weird, both my new 25amp fuses in the jumper wiring were blown and the brake pedal tried to beat my foot to death. I texted my wife to come pick me up. Trouble shooting tonight, I have now installed 30 amp fuses in the jumper rig. The rig is getting hot about 30 seconds after plugging it in. I checked the aux battery and found the voltage at about 10.5volts. The dealer had said it was bad too and I guess it finally believed him. Ran big ICE jumper cables from my wife's X5 battery posts to the Jag's starter battery. Plugged my LIP battery into the Aux battery using the famously found by Ayepace rig. The car started up normally and stayed running when I disconnected all the jumpers. I guess my days of running around town on jumper batteries is done unless I buy another LIP battery.
 

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Dealer replaced my Starter and Aux batteries, did a software upgrade and replaced my electronic key receiving antennae in the car. They are ordering another backbox for my locking problem as the more powerfull antennae did not fix the problem of not opening the door handle with the key in your pocket. The big batteries are working Ok. Took a 160 mile trip today and every thing works with the battery issue except for the TCU battery which shows 0% on WattCat. But the over the air Wattcat and Jag remote apps are working ok? Does anyone know if the Wattcat reading of % comes from only 1 battery in the TCU ? They gave me a rental Ford Mustang with a 4 cyl engine while the work was being done. Now I know another reason I have an electric car! I have >28,000 miles on my car.
 

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TCU battery is a small backup battery (AA like) in the TCU module. When all battery are dead or disconnected, it provides some juice to the TCU until it ran flat as well. This TCU battery takes a couple of days to reach 100% from 0.
 

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Due to the electronic key module being ordered, I haven't gotten the paperwork on the car yet. The nice young service writer said I would get it when all the work was complete. She convinced me it was OK! I suspect I will again ask about the TCU this next trip, for the key module. Still reads 0% but WattCat works OK and that was the Writers stance.
 

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Hi GoldRiver,
Can't say that I have kept my maintainer for several months, but I have left it connected for a week without issues on a couple of occasions. It was able to top off the battery. I just have a cheap 800mA unit (link below) so not much difference than your 750mA.

I am still not sure about how this whole thing would work. If 12v battery is dead and the car won't start, would this 800mA or something similar be used to jump start the car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
It probably would not supply enough power to jump the car and get it started immediately. You'd have to let it try to charge the 12V battery for a period of time. It would be insurance for keeping the 12V battery charged if the car is in storage for a period of time.

You would need a charger supplying multiple amps to get the car started immediately.
 

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It probably would not supply enough power to jump the car and get it started immediately. You'd have to let it try to charge the 12V battery for a period of time. It would be insurance for keeping the 12V battery charged if the car is in storage for a period of time.

You would need a charger supplying multiple amps to get the car started immediately.
Thanks. So this small device will only maintain and trickle charge the 12v battery. Here are a few more questions.

0) How long would it take for such a device to trickle charge the 12v battery back to life?
1) When does I-pace normally charge the 12v battery? When driving, charging, waking up periodically when parked, or all the above?
2) One would assume, normally, there is no need to connect such device to the car unless, maybe, when it is going to be parked for an extended period of time.
3) Never the less, will connecting such device to the car increase the life of 12v battery?
4) Can one simple jump start the I-pace with an ICE car to get to the next stop?
5) Which device should we keep in the car to prepare for an emergency dealing of 12v battery problems?

Thanks again
 

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0. Trickle charging a dead battery can take up to several days depending on the trickle charger and how badly the battery was drained (or not be successful at all)
3. It may extend battery life but I wouldn't sweat it
4. That may work, I personally have not tried it
5. The AAA phone number
1,2 were answered in various posts above
 
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