Level 2 Charging <32amp plug - Page 2 - Jaguar I-Pace EV400 Forum
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post #11 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-01-2019, 11:30 PM
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When my last EVSuppybreaker died(6yo, Leviton), I took it apart, to salvage the wiring and did some reading on the devices I found in the box. In my house's electric panel supply I have a 40 watt(2gang,1phase)breaker going to my EVSupplybreaker. My Ford Focus Electric draws 29amps(6.6kw charger under the car in the catalytic converter space) measured at the 40 amp supply breaker in my house electrical panel, when the battery is low and has begun to charge. Some time late in the charge this amperage drops down for 2 reasons, one your battery is getting crowded with electrons and is providing some resistance to being charged and your EVSupplybreaker begins to throttle back in amps because the car is telling it to(due to programing and /or heat). The EVsupply breaker does this by a ring of wires and steel ring wrapped around the incoming AC wires. This is also 1 instrument that senses overload(lightning!) and trips the EVsupply breaker open if needed. If the car's battery requires equalizing at the end of the charge, the EVSupplybreaker uses only one leg of the feeder for a 120vac supply to the car charger. I believe both the car charger and the EVsupply breaker realign (grounds) to accomplish this feat. My current EVSupply breaker (AeroVironment) flashes a separate light when it goes into this 120vac equalizing mode.
For amp max. reference: I have found that my house solar panels require a 20amp breaker (240vac) per leg of panels and the leg should have less than 16 amps in that leg per code where I live.
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post #12 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-02-2019, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by wbjag View Post
n00b QQ. Does anyone have experience charging from a plug with less than 32a 7kw capacity. Say the breaker is only 240v/20a, will the breaker trip or will the I-Pace somehow mysteriously charge at a lesser rate? Or is there some option to change the charging rate? I may not be phrasing this question correctly but I hope you get the jest.

Although the question is asked about the breaker capacity, nowhere is the info about what kind of plug the owner has.


First of all, if we were talking milkshakes, and you tried to suck too much thick milkshake through a straw too small, it would blow the milkshake breaker. Same with current, if the breaker senses one is trying pull too much (AC) through it, it shuts down to protect the connections and load capacity of the wiring.


I would assume that the person asking the question isn't an electrician. I would like to know just what kind of plug he has start the other half of the conversation. There's a $h*t-ton of plugs out there but if he's talking a 240/20 that says to me a standard 3 prong cord with a lug turned sideways (leaving twist lock connectors out of the conversation) . Regular Edison type plugs are only rated for 15 amps no matter if it's a cheapy or pro model. Once you get into a 20 amp plug you have to go with the one spade sideways type. I don't know what comes with an iPace because I don't have one, but assume a 120volt charger?


If the soon to be electric car owner is planning on using a 220 volt outlet already in their garage, then usually they're going to looking at plugging into their existing 3 prong (older) dryer plug or newer 4 prong dryer plug. The difference between the 2, being new types have a ground AND a neutral. Most older plugs plugs are going to be (dual) 30 amp breakers, and maybe depending on exact type a (dual) 50 amp breaker if you have a sexy 14-50 (my favorite) plug.



If the electrical installation was done by a pro, then the breaker cannot exceed the plug rating. So if you have a older 3 prong type then it's not going to be a (dual) 50. If the person asking the question has indeed a 240/20 and it's actually hooked up the a dryer plug then someone would have had to switch out to a small breaker which would be nonsense. So that again leaves me with the idea that the question revolves around the plug which must be a small non-dryer plug type, and couldn't handle anything over 20 amps at best, and would have to be a spade turned sideways if indeed you wanted to pull 20 amps. Me personally I would never have a device pulling the maximum rated capacity on a plug, because it will be warm and that's not cool, and you shouldn't exceed about 80% of the rated capacity. Both the i3 and the Cad ELR pull 12amps at maximum, for a reason, while nursing on that breaker.



Basically the electrical world must be based on constant draw, and not dynamic power, the difference being one is like a heater, light, car charger, etc versus power being demanded in spurts, in which a breaker, wire, or plug can handle substantial amounts more if we were talking power amps, and things with zero cycle starts like your frig.



I hope that helps or makes any sense... If anyone is going to get new wiring, get a 14-50 plug and be clear to the electrician that you want a 14-50 and not a L14-50 because sometimes electricians will default to other worlds they work in. L denotes twist lock type connections.

2017 FPace - S Odyssey Red, black blades, black pack
2007 XK coupe in Black w Carelia wheels
2016 Cadillac ELR
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post #13 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-02-2019, 01:30 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by deafsoundguy View Post
Although the question is asked about the breaker capacity, nowhere is the info about what kind of plug the owner has.


First of all, if we were talking milkshakes, and you tried to suck too much thick milkshake through a straw too small, it would blow the milkshake breaker. Same with current, if the breaker senses one is trying pull too much (AC) through it, it shuts down to protect the connections and load capacity of the wiring.


I would assume that the person asking the question isn't an electrician. I would like to know just what kind of plug he has start the other half of the conversation. There's a $h*t-ton of plugs out there but if he's talking a 240/20 that says to me a standard 3 prong cord with a lug turned sideways (leaving twist lock connectors out of the conversation) . Regular Edison type plugs are only rated for 15 amps no matter if it's a cheapy or pro model. Once you get into a 20 amp plug you have to go with the one spade sideways type. I don't know what comes with an iPace because I don't have one, but assume a 120volt charger?


If the soon to be electric car owner is planning on using a 220 volt outlet already in their garage, then usually they're going to looking at plugging into their existing 3 prong (older) dryer plug or newer 4 prong dryer plug. The difference between the 2, being new types have a ground AND a neutral. Most older plugs plugs are going to be (dual) 30 amp breakers, and maybe depending on exact type a (dual) 50 amp breaker if you have a sexy 14-50 (my favorite) plug.



If the electrical installation was done by a pro, then the breaker cannot exceed the plug rating. So if you have a older 3 prong type then it's not going to be a (dual) 50. If the person asking the question has indeed a 240/20 and it's actually hooked up the a dryer plug then someone would have had to switch out to a small breaker which would be nonsense. So that again leaves me with the idea that the question revolves around the plug which must be a small non-dryer plug type, and couldn't handle anything over 20 amps at best, and would have to be a spade turned sideways if indeed you wanted to pull 20 amps. Me personally I would never have a device pulling the maximum rated capacity on a plug, because it will be warm and that's not cool, and you shouldn't exceed about 80% of the rated capacity. Both the i3 and the Cad ELR pull 12amps at maximum, for a reason, while nursing on that breaker.



Basically the electrical world must be based on constant draw, and not dynamic power, the difference being one is like a heater, light, car charger, etc versus power being demanded in spurts, in which a breaker, wire, or plug can handle substantial amounts more if we were talking power amps, and things with zero cycle starts like your frig.



I hope that helps or makes any sense... If anyone is going to get new wiring, get a 14-50 plug and be clear to the electrician that you want a 14-50 and not a L14-50 because sometimes electricians will default to other worlds they work in. L denotes twist lock type connections.
You misunderstand my question, I was wondering if there is an option in the I-Pace settings to limit the amount of current the charger is pulling so not to blow the upstream breaker. You can set this in some chargers and some chargers configure it automatically based on the plug. I was wondering if this functionality is in the I-Pace settings. Not having a vehicle "as yet" to play with, I don't know if it is available in settings manually, automatically, otherwise or not at all.

Just FYI, I wired my current Nema 6-50 receptacle with 6/3 so that I have the neutral available that I can switch out to a Nema 14-50 later if needed.

2020 I-Pace HSE
Fuji White/20" 5 spoke 'Style 5068' with Diamond Turned finish/(AdSR)
Light Oyster Windsor leather sport seats with Ebony/Light Oyster interior
Light Oyster Suedecloth headlining/Heated steering wheel/Head-up Display
18-way heated and cooled electric memory front seats with heated rear seats
Meridian™ Surround Sound System/Gloss Charcoal Ash veneer
Front fog lights/Four-zone Climate Control
Configurable Ambient Interior Lighting
Delivery 08/16/19
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post #14 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-03-2019, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by wbjag View Post
You misunderstand my question, I was wondering if there is an option in the I-Pace settings to limit the amount of current the charger is pulling so not to blow the upstream breaker. You can set this in some chargers and some chargers configure it automatically based on the plug. I was wondering if this functionality is in the I-Pace settings. Not having a vehicle "as yet" to play with, I don't know if it is available in settings manually, automatically, otherwise or not at all.

Just FYI, I wired my current Nema 6-50 receptacle with 6/3 so that I have the neutral available that I can switch out to a Nema 14-50 later if needed.

Since there's always the ability for people to use adapters, then the possibility always exists for people to melt their plugs (or worse cause a fire). There's always a plug between the charger and the breaker, so my mind goes there first. Being a sound company, I've melted a few plugs in my life before I learned about current draw, draw over distance, breaker types and quality, as well of course wire gauge... And sometimes the charger or charger plug can go bad and that can really heat things up! That actually happened on my first i3 charger...

2017 FPace - S Odyssey Red, black blades, black pack
2007 XK coupe in Black w Carelia wheels
2016 Cadillac ELR
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post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-03-2019, 01:55 PM
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The answer to wbjag's question is: No, there is not a setting in the I-pace itself. The external charging unit, either the one that comes with the car or supplied separately, tells the car what the maximum power is that can be supplied. Chargepoint, Juicebox, or whatever, can either be set to a maximum to allow before connecting to the car, or they are fixed based on their capabilities.
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post #16 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-04-2019, 01:41 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Ayepace View Post
The answer to wbjag's question is: No, there is not a setting in the I-pace itself. The external charging unit, either the one that comes with the car or supplied separately, tells the car what the maximum power is that can be supplied. Chargepoint, Juicebox, or whatever, can either be set to a maximum to allow before connecting to the car, or they are fixed based on their capabilities.
Thanks Ayepace.

2020 I-Pace HSE
Fuji White/20" 5 spoke 'Style 5068' with Diamond Turned finish/(AdSR)
Light Oyster Windsor leather sport seats with Ebony/Light Oyster interior
Light Oyster Suedecloth headlining/Heated steering wheel/Head-up Display
18-way heated and cooled electric memory front seats with heated rear seats
Meridian™ Surround Sound System/Gloss Charcoal Ash veneer
Front fog lights/Four-zone Climate Control
Configurable Ambient Interior Lighting
Delivery 08/16/19
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post #17 of 17 (permalink) Old 06-04-2019, 03:00 PM
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I'm charging at 16amp max (EVSE is 16amp and breaker is 20amp max). The I-Pace just charges at a slower pace.
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